Chapter 2 Functional genomic methodologies

Stephen D. Ginsberg, Károly Mirnics

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

28 Scopus citations

Abstract

The ability to form tenable hypotheses regarding the neurobiological basis of normative functions as well as mechanisms underlying neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric disorders is often limited by the highly complex brain circuitry and the cellular and molecular mosaics therein. The brain is an intricate structure with heterogeneous neuronal and nonneuronal cell populations dispersed throughout the central nervous system. Varied and diverse brain functions are mediated through gene expression, and ultimately protein expression, within these cell types and interconnected circuits. Large-scale high-throughput analysis of gene expression in brain regions and individual cell populations using modern functional genomics technologies has enabled the simultaneous quantitative assessment of dozens to hundreds to thousands of genes. Technical and experimental advances in the accession of tissues, RNA amplification technologies, and the refinement of downstream genetic methodologies including microarray analysis and real-time quantitative PCR have generated a wellspring of informative studies pertinent to understanding brain structure and function. In this review, we outline the advantages as well as some of the potential challenges of applying high throughput functional genomics technologies toward a better understanding of brain tissues and diseases using animal models as well as human postmortem tissues.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationFunctional Genomics and Proteomics in the Clinical Neurosciences
EditorsS.E. Hemby, S. Bahn
Pages15-40
Number of pages26
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 6 2006

Publication series

NameProgress in Brain Research
Volume158
ISSN (Print)0079-6123

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Keywords

  • QPCR
  • RNA amplification
  • brain
  • gene expression
  • microarray
  • molecular fingerprint
  • transcriptome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Ginsberg, S. D., & Mirnics, K. (2006). Chapter 2 Functional genomic methodologies. In S. E. Hemby, & S. Bahn (Eds.), Functional Genomics and Proteomics in the Clinical Neurosciences (pp. 15-40). (Progress in Brain Research; Vol. 158). https://doi.org/10.1016/S0079-6123(06)58002-1