Changes in extreme events and the potential impacts on human health

Jesse E Bell, Claudia Langford Brown, Kathryn Conlon, Stephanie Herring, Kenneth E. Kunkel, Jay Lawrimore, George Luber, Carl Schreck, Adam Smith, Christopher Uejio

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Extreme weather and climate-related events affect human health by causing death, injury, and illness, as well as having large socioeconomic impacts. Climate change has caused changes in extreme event frequency, intensity, and geographic distribution, and will continue to be a driver for change in the future. Some of these events include heat waves, droughts, wildfires, dust storms, flooding rains, coastal flooding, storm surges, and hurricanes. The pathways connecting extreme events to health outcomes and economic losses can be diverse and complex. The difficulty in predicting these relationships comes from the local societal and environmental factors that affect disease burden. More information is needed about the impacts of climate change on public health and economies to effectively plan for and adapt to climate change. This paper describes some of the ways extreme events are changing and provides examples of the potential impacts on human health and infrastructure. It also identifies key research gaps to be addressed to improve the resilience of public health to extreme events in the future. Implications: Extreme weather and climate events affect human health by causing death, injury, and illness, as well as having large socioeconomic impacts. Climate change has caused changes in extreme event frequency, intensity, and geographic distribution, and will continue to be a driver for change in the future. Some of these events include heat waves, droughts, wildfires, flooding rains, coastal flooding, surges, and hurricanes. The pathways connecting extreme events to health outcomes and economic losses can be diverse and complex. The difficulty in predicting these relationships comes from the local societal and environmental factors that affect disease burden.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)265-287
Number of pages23
JournalJournal of the Air and Waste Management Association
Volume68
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 3 2018

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extreme event
flooding
socioeconomic impact
climate change
wildfire
hurricane
public health
environmental factor
drought
weather
dust storm
storm surge
climate
economics
human health
infrastructure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Waste Management and Disposal
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law

Cite this

Changes in extreme events and the potential impacts on human health. / Bell, Jesse E; Brown, Claudia Langford; Conlon, Kathryn; Herring, Stephanie; Kunkel, Kenneth E.; Lawrimore, Jay; Luber, George; Schreck, Carl; Smith, Adam; Uejio, Christopher.

In: Journal of the Air and Waste Management Association, Vol. 68, No. 4, 03.04.2018, p. 265-287.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Bell, JE, Brown, CL, Conlon, K, Herring, S, Kunkel, KE, Lawrimore, J, Luber, G, Schreck, C, Smith, A & Uejio, C 2018, 'Changes in extreme events and the potential impacts on human health', Journal of the Air and Waste Management Association, vol. 68, no. 4, pp. 265-287. https://doi.org/10.1080/10962247.2017.1401017
Bell, Jesse E ; Brown, Claudia Langford ; Conlon, Kathryn ; Herring, Stephanie ; Kunkel, Kenneth E. ; Lawrimore, Jay ; Luber, George ; Schreck, Carl ; Smith, Adam ; Uejio, Christopher. / Changes in extreme events and the potential impacts on human health. In: Journal of the Air and Waste Management Association. 2018 ; Vol. 68, No. 4. pp. 265-287.
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