Changes in dietary fiber fractions and gut microbial fermentation properties of wheat bran after extrusion and bread making

Jennifer A. Arcila, Steven A. Weier, Devin J. Rose

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The dietary fiber in wheat bran, principally non-starch polysaccharides (NSP), is mostly water-unextractable and is poorly utilized by human gut microbiota. The purpose of this study was to determine the change in water-extractability of NSP in wheat bran upon extrusion and then to determine if extrusion impacts the availability of NSP for fermentation by the fecal microbiota during in vitro fecal fermentation. A secondary objective was to incorporate extruded bran into a product formulation to determine if changes in WE-NSP and NSP fermentation were maintained in a finished product. Bran was extruded using combinations of high or low moisture (15% and 30% wb) and high or low screw speed (120 and 250. rpm). All extrusion conditions resulted in increases in WE-NSP and fecal microbiota short chain fatty acid (SCFA) production upon fermentation compared with unextruded bran. Low screw speed and low moisture resulted in the greatest increase in WE-NSP (3-fold) as well as the highest production of SCFA during fermentation (1.4-fold) compared with unextruded bran. Whole wheat breads containing extruded bran did not show increases in either WE-NSP or SCFA production compared with the control. In conclusion, extrusion of wheat bran increased WE-NSP, which enabled greater fermentability by human fecal microbiota. However, once extruded bran was used in a whole wheat bread formulation the changes in fermentation outcomes were no longer evident.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)217-223
Number of pages7
JournalFood Research International
Volume74
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2015

Fingerprint

Bread
Dietary Fiber
wheat bran
intestinal microorganisms
extrusion
breads
Fermentation
Polysaccharides
dietary fiber
polysaccharides
fermentation
bran
Volatile Fatty Acids
Microbiota
short chain fatty acids
whole wheat bread
screws
Triticum
Water
water

Keywords

  • Arabinoxylans
  • Butyrate
  • Moisture
  • Non-starch polysaccharides
  • Screw speed
  • Short chain fatty acids

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science

Cite this

Changes in dietary fiber fractions and gut microbial fermentation properties of wheat bran after extrusion and bread making. / Arcila, Jennifer A.; Weier, Steven A.; Rose, Devin J.

In: Food Research International, Vol. 74, 01.08.2015, p. 217-223.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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