CFTR expression does not influence glycosylation of an epitope-tagged MUC1 mucin in colon carcinoma cell lines

Colm J. Reid, Michael D. Burdick, Michael A. Hollingsworth, Ann Harris

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The cause of the mucus clearance problems associated with cystic fibrosis remains poorly understood though it has been suggested that mucin hypersecretion, dehydration of mucins, and biochemical abnormalities in the glycosylation of mucins may be responsible. Since the biochemical and biophysical properties of a mucin are dependent on O-glycosylation, our aim was to evaluate the O-glycosylation of a single mucin gene product in matched pairs of cells that differed with respect to CFTR expression. An epitope-tagged MUC1 mucin cDNA (MUC1F) was used to detect variation in mucin glycosylation in stably transfected colon carcinoma cell lines HT29 and Caco2. The glycosylation of MUC1F mucin was evaluated in matched pairs of Caco2 cell lines that either express wild-type CFTR or have spontaneously lost CFTR expression. The general glycosylation pattern of MUC1F was evaluated by determining its reactivity with a series of monoclonal antibodies against known blood group and tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens. Metabolic labeling experiments were used to estimate the gross levels of glycosylation and sulfation of MUC1F mucin in these matched pairs of cell lines. Expression of CFTR in this experimental system did not affect the gross levels of glycosylation or sulfation of the MUC1F mucin nor the types of carbohydrates structures attached to the MUC1F protein.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)389-398
Number of pages10
JournalGlycobiology
Volume9
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1999

Fingerprint

Glycosylation
Mucins
Epitopes
Colon
Cells
Carcinoma
Cell Line
Tumor-Associated Carbohydrate Antigens
Mucus
Blood Group Antigens
Dehydration
Cystic Fibrosis
Labeling
Complementary DNA
Genes
Monoclonal Antibodies
Carbohydrates

Keywords

  • Cystic fibrosis
  • Glycosylation
  • MUC1
  • Mucin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry

Cite this

CFTR expression does not influence glycosylation of an epitope-tagged MUC1 mucin in colon carcinoma cell lines. / Reid, Colm J.; Burdick, Michael D.; Hollingsworth, Michael A.; Harris, Ann.

In: Glycobiology, Vol. 9, No. 4, 04.1999, p. 389-398.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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