Centrifugal pumping

The patient outcome benefits following coronary artery bypass surgery

W. J. DeBois, R. Brennan, E. Wein, O. W. Isom, Jeffrey P Gold

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The increased use of the centrifugal pump during coronary artery bypass surgery has been based primarily on theoretical data related to patient safety. There is minimal evidence suggesting improved outcome when compared to the traditional roller pump technology. We prospectively randomized 200 patients undergoing elective coronary artery bypass grafting into centrifugal pump (100 patients) and roller pump (100 patients) groups to compare differences in blood product usage, complication rate, length of stay and net hospital financial balance. Moderate hypothermic bypass was employed on all patients. Cardiopulmonary bypass circuits were similar in both groups with the exception of the arterial pump. Both groups were statistically identical in regard to age, sex, surgeon, complications, total pump time, aortic cross clamp time, prebypass hematocrit and platelet count. The twenty-four hour postoperative hematocrits, platelet counts, red blood cell requirements, blood loss and mortality (2%) were identical in both groups. The centrifugal pump patients had less 24 hour weight gain than their peers in the roller pump group (p=0.05) The length of stay and net hospital financial balance were also statistically favored in the centrifugal pump group (p<0.05). These latter findings were significant when studied in all payors and coronary artery bypass diagnostic related group classifications. Although the mechanism for improvement in length of stay and net hospital financial balance cannot fully be explained, the ramifications in an increasingly cost conscious environment are obvious.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)77-80
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Extra-Corporeal Technology
Volume27
Issue number2
StatePublished - Jul 5 1995

Fingerprint

Coronary Artery Bypass
Length of Stay
Platelet Count
Hematocrit
Erythrocyte Count
Diagnosis-Related Groups
Patient Safety
Cardiopulmonary Bypass
Weight Gain
Technology
Costs and Cost Analysis
Mortality

Keywords

  • cardiopulmonary bypass
  • centrifugal pump
  • device comparison
  • roller pump

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Centrifugal pumping : The patient outcome benefits following coronary artery bypass surgery. / DeBois, W. J.; Brennan, R.; Wein, E.; Isom, O. W.; Gold, Jeffrey P.

In: Journal of Extra-Corporeal Technology, Vol. 27, No. 2, 05.07.1995, p. 77-80.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{0c3da51e2e174c7bbfada3bf6202d475,
title = "Centrifugal pumping: The patient outcome benefits following coronary artery bypass surgery",
abstract = "The increased use of the centrifugal pump during coronary artery bypass surgery has been based primarily on theoretical data related to patient safety. There is minimal evidence suggesting improved outcome when compared to the traditional roller pump technology. We prospectively randomized 200 patients undergoing elective coronary artery bypass grafting into centrifugal pump (100 patients) and roller pump (100 patients) groups to compare differences in blood product usage, complication rate, length of stay and net hospital financial balance. Moderate hypothermic bypass was employed on all patients. Cardiopulmonary bypass circuits were similar in both groups with the exception of the arterial pump. Both groups were statistically identical in regard to age, sex, surgeon, complications, total pump time, aortic cross clamp time, prebypass hematocrit and platelet count. The twenty-four hour postoperative hematocrits, platelet counts, red blood cell requirements, blood loss and mortality (2{\%}) were identical in both groups. The centrifugal pump patients had less 24 hour weight gain than their peers in the roller pump group (p=0.05) The length of stay and net hospital financial balance were also statistically favored in the centrifugal pump group (p<0.05). These latter findings were significant when studied in all payors and coronary artery bypass diagnostic related group classifications. Although the mechanism for improvement in length of stay and net hospital financial balance cannot fully be explained, the ramifications in an increasingly cost conscious environment are obvious.",
keywords = "cardiopulmonary bypass, centrifugal pump, device comparison, roller pump",
author = "DeBois, {W. J.} and R. Brennan and E. Wein and Isom, {O. W.} and Gold, {Jeffrey P}",
year = "1995",
month = "7",
day = "5",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "27",
pages = "77--80",
journal = "Journal of Extra-Corporeal Technology",
issn = "0022-1058",
publisher = "American Society of Extra-Corporeal Technology",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Centrifugal pumping

T2 - The patient outcome benefits following coronary artery bypass surgery

AU - DeBois, W. J.

AU - Brennan, R.

AU - Wein, E.

AU - Isom, O. W.

AU - Gold, Jeffrey P

PY - 1995/7/5

Y1 - 1995/7/5

N2 - The increased use of the centrifugal pump during coronary artery bypass surgery has been based primarily on theoretical data related to patient safety. There is minimal evidence suggesting improved outcome when compared to the traditional roller pump technology. We prospectively randomized 200 patients undergoing elective coronary artery bypass grafting into centrifugal pump (100 patients) and roller pump (100 patients) groups to compare differences in blood product usage, complication rate, length of stay and net hospital financial balance. Moderate hypothermic bypass was employed on all patients. Cardiopulmonary bypass circuits were similar in both groups with the exception of the arterial pump. Both groups were statistically identical in regard to age, sex, surgeon, complications, total pump time, aortic cross clamp time, prebypass hematocrit and platelet count. The twenty-four hour postoperative hematocrits, platelet counts, red blood cell requirements, blood loss and mortality (2%) were identical in both groups. The centrifugal pump patients had less 24 hour weight gain than their peers in the roller pump group (p=0.05) The length of stay and net hospital financial balance were also statistically favored in the centrifugal pump group (p<0.05). These latter findings were significant when studied in all payors and coronary artery bypass diagnostic related group classifications. Although the mechanism for improvement in length of stay and net hospital financial balance cannot fully be explained, the ramifications in an increasingly cost conscious environment are obvious.

AB - The increased use of the centrifugal pump during coronary artery bypass surgery has been based primarily on theoretical data related to patient safety. There is minimal evidence suggesting improved outcome when compared to the traditional roller pump technology. We prospectively randomized 200 patients undergoing elective coronary artery bypass grafting into centrifugal pump (100 patients) and roller pump (100 patients) groups to compare differences in blood product usage, complication rate, length of stay and net hospital financial balance. Moderate hypothermic bypass was employed on all patients. Cardiopulmonary bypass circuits were similar in both groups with the exception of the arterial pump. Both groups were statistically identical in regard to age, sex, surgeon, complications, total pump time, aortic cross clamp time, prebypass hematocrit and platelet count. The twenty-four hour postoperative hematocrits, platelet counts, red blood cell requirements, blood loss and mortality (2%) were identical in both groups. The centrifugal pump patients had less 24 hour weight gain than their peers in the roller pump group (p=0.05) The length of stay and net hospital financial balance were also statistically favored in the centrifugal pump group (p<0.05). These latter findings were significant when studied in all payors and coronary artery bypass diagnostic related group classifications. Although the mechanism for improvement in length of stay and net hospital financial balance cannot fully be explained, the ramifications in an increasingly cost conscious environment are obvious.

KW - cardiopulmonary bypass

KW - centrifugal pump

KW - device comparison

KW - roller pump

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0029000298&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0029000298&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 27

SP - 77

EP - 80

JO - Journal of Extra-Corporeal Technology

JF - Journal of Extra-Corporeal Technology

SN - 0022-1058

IS - 2

ER -