Cell proliferation in carcinogenesis

Samuel Monroe Cohen, Leon B. Ellwein

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

915 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Chemicals that induce cancer at high doses in animal bioassays often fail to fit the traditional characterization of genotoxins. Many of these nongenotoxic compounds (such as sodium saccharin) have in common the property that they increase cell proliferation in the target organ. A biologically based, computerized description of carcinogenesis was used to show that the increase in cell proliferation can account for the carcinogenicity of nongenotoxic compounds. The carcinogenic dose-response relationship for genotoxic chemicals (such as 2-acetylaminofluorene) was also due in part to increased cell proliferation. Mechanistic information is required for determination of the existence of a threshold for the proliferative (and carcinogenic) response of nongenotoxic chemicals and the estimation of risk for human exposure.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1007-1011
Number of pages5
JournalScience
Volume249
Issue number4972
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1990

Fingerprint

Carcinogenesis
Cell Proliferation
2-Acetylaminofluorene
Saccharin
Mutagens
Biological Assay
Neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Cell proliferation in carcinogenesis. / Cohen, Samuel Monroe; Ellwein, Leon B.

In: Science, Vol. 249, No. 4972, 01.01.1990, p. 1007-1011.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Cohen, SM & Ellwein, LB 1990, 'Cell proliferation in carcinogenesis', Science, vol. 249, no. 4972, pp. 1007-1011. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.2204108
Cohen, Samuel Monroe ; Ellwein, Leon B. / Cell proliferation in carcinogenesis. In: Science. 1990 ; Vol. 249, No. 4972. pp. 1007-1011.
@article{43e88157140b48a3939b471f149edcb4,
title = "Cell proliferation in carcinogenesis",
abstract = "Chemicals that induce cancer at high doses in animal bioassays often fail to fit the traditional characterization of genotoxins. Many of these nongenotoxic compounds (such as sodium saccharin) have in common the property that they increase cell proliferation in the target organ. A biologically based, computerized description of carcinogenesis was used to show that the increase in cell proliferation can account for the carcinogenicity of nongenotoxic compounds. The carcinogenic dose-response relationship for genotoxic chemicals (such as 2-acetylaminofluorene) was also due in part to increased cell proliferation. Mechanistic information is required for determination of the existence of a threshold for the proliferative (and carcinogenic) response of nongenotoxic chemicals and the estimation of risk for human exposure.",
author = "Cohen, {Samuel Monroe} and Ellwein, {Leon B.}",
year = "1990",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1126/science.2204108",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "249",
pages = "1007--1011",
journal = "Science",
issn = "0036-8075",
publisher = "American Association for the Advancement of Science",
number = "4972",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Cell proliferation in carcinogenesis

AU - Cohen, Samuel Monroe

AU - Ellwein, Leon B.

PY - 1990/1/1

Y1 - 1990/1/1

N2 - Chemicals that induce cancer at high doses in animal bioassays often fail to fit the traditional characterization of genotoxins. Many of these nongenotoxic compounds (such as sodium saccharin) have in common the property that they increase cell proliferation in the target organ. A biologically based, computerized description of carcinogenesis was used to show that the increase in cell proliferation can account for the carcinogenicity of nongenotoxic compounds. The carcinogenic dose-response relationship for genotoxic chemicals (such as 2-acetylaminofluorene) was also due in part to increased cell proliferation. Mechanistic information is required for determination of the existence of a threshold for the proliferative (and carcinogenic) response of nongenotoxic chemicals and the estimation of risk for human exposure.

AB - Chemicals that induce cancer at high doses in animal bioassays often fail to fit the traditional characterization of genotoxins. Many of these nongenotoxic compounds (such as sodium saccharin) have in common the property that they increase cell proliferation in the target organ. A biologically based, computerized description of carcinogenesis was used to show that the increase in cell proliferation can account for the carcinogenicity of nongenotoxic compounds. The carcinogenic dose-response relationship for genotoxic chemicals (such as 2-acetylaminofluorene) was also due in part to increased cell proliferation. Mechanistic information is required for determination of the existence of a threshold for the proliferative (and carcinogenic) response of nongenotoxic chemicals and the estimation of risk for human exposure.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0025168534&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0025168534&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1126/science.2204108

DO - 10.1126/science.2204108

M3 - Review article

C2 - 2204108

AN - SCOPUS:0025168534

VL - 249

SP - 1007

EP - 1011

JO - Science

JF - Science

SN - 0036-8075

IS - 4972

ER -