Carotenoid content, physicochemical, and sensory qualities of deep-fried carrot chips as affected by dehydration/rehydration, antioxidant, and fermentation

Ahmad Sulaeman, Laune Keeler, Stephen L Taylor, David W. Giraud, Judy A. Driskell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Carrot slices were subjected to one of the following experiments prior to deep-frying: (A) dehydration/rehydration, (B) soaking in different antioxidants, and (C) fermentation with/without blanching. There were no significant differences (P ≥ 0.05) in carotenoid contents among carrot chips treated with/without dehydration. Soaking in sodium metabisulfite resulted in the highest carotenoid content and lightness (L), redness (a), and yellowness (b) values among the antioxidant treatments. Fermentation without blanching significantly decreased (P < 0.05) carotenoid content, vitamin A activity, and fat content. Dehydration and fermentation with blanching significantly increased (P < 0.05) the lightness (L), redness (a), and yellowness (b) values of the chips. Dehydration/rehydration, but not antioxidant and fermentation, significantly decreased (P < 0.05) the water activity of the chips. The textural values of carrot chips prepared using sodium metabisulfite, without dehydration and without fermentation, were the lowest among other treatments which suggests the crispiest. Carrot chips prepared using sodium metabisulfite, without dehydration and without fermentation, had the highest carotenoid content and retention, and the highest overall acceptability score.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3253-3261
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry
Volume49
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 27 2001

Fingerprint

Daucus carota
Fluid Therapy
rehydration
Carotenoids
Dehydration
carrots
Fermentation
carotenoids
Antioxidants
Blanching
fermentation
sodium metabisulfite
antioxidants
blanching
soaking
deep fat frying
Vitamin A
water activity
vitamin A
Thermodynamic properties

Keywords

  • Carotenoids
  • Carrots
  • Chips
  • Color
  • Fermentation
  • Sensory qualities

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Carotenoid content, physicochemical, and sensory qualities of deep-fried carrot chips as affected by dehydration/rehydration, antioxidant, and fermentation. / Sulaeman, Ahmad; Keeler, Laune; Taylor, Stephen L; Giraud, David W.; Driskell, Judy A.

In: Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, Vol. 49, No. 7, 27.09.2001, p. 3253-3261.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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