CaringGuidance™ after breast cancer diagnosis eHealth psychoeducational intervention to reduce early post-diagnosis distress

Robin M. Lally, Kevin A. Kupzyk, Gina Bellavia, Jennifer Hydeman, Steven Gallo, Vicki S. Helgeson, Deborah Erwin, Adam C. Mills, Jean K. Brown

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: Significant cancer-related distress affects 30–60% of women diagnosed with breast cancer. Fewer than 30% of distressed patients receive psychosocial care. Unaddressed distress is associated with poor treatment adherence, reduced quality of life, and increased healthcare costs. This study aimed to evaluate the preliminary efficacy of a new web-based, psychoeducational distress self-management program, CaringGuidance™ After Breast Cancer Diagnosis, on newly diagnosed women’s reported distress. Methods: One-hundred women, in five states, diagnosed with breast cancer within the prior 3 months, were randomized to 12 weeks of independent use of CaringGuidance™ plus usual care or usual care alone. The primary multidimensional outcome, distress, was measured with the Distress Thermometer (DT), the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), and the Impact of Events Scale (IES) at baseline and months 1, 2, and 3. Intervention usage was continually monitored by the data analytic system imbedded within CaringGuidance™. Results: Although multilevel models showed no significant overall effects, post hoc analysis showed significant group differences in slopes occurring between study months 2 and 3 on distress (F(1,70) = 4.91, p =.03, η2 =.065) measured by the DT, and depressive symptoms (F(1, 76) = 4.25, p =.043, η2 =.053) favoring the intervention. Conclusions: Results provide preliminary support for the potential efficacy of CaringGuidance™ plus usual care over usual care alone on distress in women newly diagnosed with breast cancer. This analysis supports and informs future study of this self-management program aimed at filling gaps in clinical distress management.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalSupportive Care in Cancer
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Telemedicine
Early Diagnosis
Breast Neoplasms
Thermometers
Self Care
Depression
Information Systems
Health Care Costs
Epidemiologic Studies
Quality of Life
Neoplasms
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Breast cancer
  • Depressive symptoms
  • Distress
  • Internet
  • Psychoeducation
  • Self-management

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology

Cite this

CaringGuidance™ after breast cancer diagnosis eHealth psychoeducational intervention to reduce early post-diagnosis distress. / Lally, Robin M.; Kupzyk, Kevin A.; Bellavia, Gina; Hydeman, Jennifer; Gallo, Steven; Helgeson, Vicki S.; Erwin, Deborah; Mills, Adam C.; Brown, Jean K.

In: Supportive Care in Cancer, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lally, Robin M. ; Kupzyk, Kevin A. ; Bellavia, Gina ; Hydeman, Jennifer ; Gallo, Steven ; Helgeson, Vicki S. ; Erwin, Deborah ; Mills, Adam C. ; Brown, Jean K. / CaringGuidance™ after breast cancer diagnosis eHealth psychoeducational intervention to reduce early post-diagnosis distress. In: Supportive Care in Cancer. 2019.
@article{30b6f2b713534ee491c7ef2f79770d44,
title = "CaringGuidance™ after breast cancer diagnosis eHealth psychoeducational intervention to reduce early post-diagnosis distress",
abstract = "Purpose: Significant cancer-related distress affects 30–60{\%} of women diagnosed with breast cancer. Fewer than 30{\%} of distressed patients receive psychosocial care. Unaddressed distress is associated with poor treatment adherence, reduced quality of life, and increased healthcare costs. This study aimed to evaluate the preliminary efficacy of a new web-based, psychoeducational distress self-management program, CaringGuidance™ After Breast Cancer Diagnosis, on newly diagnosed women’s reported distress. Methods: One-hundred women, in five states, diagnosed with breast cancer within the prior 3 months, were randomized to 12 weeks of independent use of CaringGuidance™ plus usual care or usual care alone. The primary multidimensional outcome, distress, was measured with the Distress Thermometer (DT), the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), and the Impact of Events Scale (IES) at baseline and months 1, 2, and 3. Intervention usage was continually monitored by the data analytic system imbedded within CaringGuidance™. Results: Although multilevel models showed no significant overall effects, post hoc analysis showed significant group differences in slopes occurring between study months 2 and 3 on distress (F(1,70) = 4.91, p =.03, η2 =.065) measured by the DT, and depressive symptoms (F(1, 76) = 4.25, p =.043, η2 =.053) favoring the intervention. Conclusions: Results provide preliminary support for the potential efficacy of CaringGuidance™ plus usual care over usual care alone on distress in women newly diagnosed with breast cancer. This analysis supports and informs future study of this self-management program aimed at filling gaps in clinical distress management.",
keywords = "Breast cancer, Depressive symptoms, Distress, Internet, Psychoeducation, Self-management",
author = "Lally, {Robin M.} and Kupzyk, {Kevin A.} and Gina Bellavia and Jennifer Hydeman and Steven Gallo and Helgeson, {Vicki S.} and Deborah Erwin and Mills, {Adam C.} and Brown, {Jean K.}",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s00520-019-05028-0",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "Supportive Care in Cancer",
issn = "0941-4355",
publisher = "Springer Verlag",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - CaringGuidance™ after breast cancer diagnosis eHealth psychoeducational intervention to reduce early post-diagnosis distress

AU - Lally, Robin M.

AU - Kupzyk, Kevin A.

AU - Bellavia, Gina

AU - Hydeman, Jennifer

AU - Gallo, Steven

AU - Helgeson, Vicki S.

AU - Erwin, Deborah

AU - Mills, Adam C.

AU - Brown, Jean K.

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Purpose: Significant cancer-related distress affects 30–60% of women diagnosed with breast cancer. Fewer than 30% of distressed patients receive psychosocial care. Unaddressed distress is associated with poor treatment adherence, reduced quality of life, and increased healthcare costs. This study aimed to evaluate the preliminary efficacy of a new web-based, psychoeducational distress self-management program, CaringGuidance™ After Breast Cancer Diagnosis, on newly diagnosed women’s reported distress. Methods: One-hundred women, in five states, diagnosed with breast cancer within the prior 3 months, were randomized to 12 weeks of independent use of CaringGuidance™ plus usual care or usual care alone. The primary multidimensional outcome, distress, was measured with the Distress Thermometer (DT), the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), and the Impact of Events Scale (IES) at baseline and months 1, 2, and 3. Intervention usage was continually monitored by the data analytic system imbedded within CaringGuidance™. Results: Although multilevel models showed no significant overall effects, post hoc analysis showed significant group differences in slopes occurring between study months 2 and 3 on distress (F(1,70) = 4.91, p =.03, η2 =.065) measured by the DT, and depressive symptoms (F(1, 76) = 4.25, p =.043, η2 =.053) favoring the intervention. Conclusions: Results provide preliminary support for the potential efficacy of CaringGuidance™ plus usual care over usual care alone on distress in women newly diagnosed with breast cancer. This analysis supports and informs future study of this self-management program aimed at filling gaps in clinical distress management.

AB - Purpose: Significant cancer-related distress affects 30–60% of women diagnosed with breast cancer. Fewer than 30% of distressed patients receive psychosocial care. Unaddressed distress is associated with poor treatment adherence, reduced quality of life, and increased healthcare costs. This study aimed to evaluate the preliminary efficacy of a new web-based, psychoeducational distress self-management program, CaringGuidance™ After Breast Cancer Diagnosis, on newly diagnosed women’s reported distress. Methods: One-hundred women, in five states, diagnosed with breast cancer within the prior 3 months, were randomized to 12 weeks of independent use of CaringGuidance™ plus usual care or usual care alone. The primary multidimensional outcome, distress, was measured with the Distress Thermometer (DT), the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), and the Impact of Events Scale (IES) at baseline and months 1, 2, and 3. Intervention usage was continually monitored by the data analytic system imbedded within CaringGuidance™. Results: Although multilevel models showed no significant overall effects, post hoc analysis showed significant group differences in slopes occurring between study months 2 and 3 on distress (F(1,70) = 4.91, p =.03, η2 =.065) measured by the DT, and depressive symptoms (F(1, 76) = 4.25, p =.043, η2 =.053) favoring the intervention. Conclusions: Results provide preliminary support for the potential efficacy of CaringGuidance™ plus usual care over usual care alone on distress in women newly diagnosed with breast cancer. This analysis supports and informs future study of this self-management program aimed at filling gaps in clinical distress management.

KW - Breast cancer

KW - Depressive symptoms

KW - Distress

KW - Internet

KW - Psychoeducation

KW - Self-management

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85070950760&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85070950760&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s00520-019-05028-0

DO - 10.1007/s00520-019-05028-0

M3 - Article

C2 - 31414245

AN - SCOPUS:85070950760

JO - Supportive Care in Cancer

JF - Supportive Care in Cancer

SN - 0941-4355

ER -