Caring for the caregiver

Geline Joy Tamayo, Anita Broxson, Mark Munsell, Marlene Z Cohen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

74 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose/Objectives: To describe the quality of life (QOL) and well-being of caregivers of patients receiving outpatient chemotherapy for leukemia and to identify strategies to promote the best possible QOL and well-being for the caregivers. Design: Descriptive, cross-sectional study. Setting: Ambulatory treatment center of a major comprehensive cancer center in the southern United States. Sample: Convenience sample of 194 caregivers of patients receiving chemotherapy for leukemia. Methods: Participants completed the Caregiver Quality-of-Life-Cancer Scale, the Caregiver Well-Being Scale, and the Learning Needs Questionnaire developed by the authors. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize the demographic characteristics of the caregivers, and exploratory factor analysis was performed to identify meaningful factors. Main Research Variables: QOL, well-being, and learning needs. Findings: Caregivers identified burden as their most important concern for QOL. Key factors identified with caregivers' well-being were expression of feelings and household maintenance. Caregivers identified giving medications and managing the side effects as crucial to learning needs. Communication, positive attitudes, support, and education were important in promoting QOL for the caregivers. Conclusions: Caregiving for a patient receiving chemotherapy for leukemia influences the QOL and well-being of the caregiver. Implications for Nursing: This study highlights the need for better nurse-caregiver communication and education, particularly in the areas of symptom management and medication administration. Additional research should focus on factors that affect caregivers' QOL, their educational needs, and improved interventions for delivering new information or reinforcing old information.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalOncology nursing forum
Volume37
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2010

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Caregivers
Quality of Life
Leukemia
Learning
Drug Therapy
Communication
Education
Research
Statistical Factor Analysis
Neoplasms
Emotions
Nursing
Outpatients
Cross-Sectional Studies
Nurses
Demography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology(nursing)

Cite this

Tamayo, G. J., Broxson, A., Munsell, M., & Cohen, M. Z. (2010). Caring for the caregiver. Oncology nursing forum, 37(1). https://doi.org/10.1188/10.ONF.E50-E57

Caring for the caregiver. / Tamayo, Geline Joy; Broxson, Anita; Munsell, Mark; Cohen, Marlene Z.

In: Oncology nursing forum, Vol. 37, No. 1, 01.01.2010.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tamayo, GJ, Broxson, A, Munsell, M & Cohen, MZ 2010, 'Caring for the caregiver', Oncology nursing forum, vol. 37, no. 1. https://doi.org/10.1188/10.ONF.E50-E57
Tamayo GJ, Broxson A, Munsell M, Cohen MZ. Caring for the caregiver. Oncology nursing forum. 2010 Jan 1;37(1). https://doi.org/10.1188/10.ONF.E50-E57
Tamayo, Geline Joy ; Broxson, Anita ; Munsell, Mark ; Cohen, Marlene Z. / Caring for the caregiver. In: Oncology nursing forum. 2010 ; Vol. 37, No. 1.
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