Capturing the Energy of Peer Pressure: Insights from a Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Cigarette Smoking

Ian M. Newman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The effects of peer pressure on smoking behavior were described by subjects in a longitudinal study in the ninth grade, the 11th grade and 10 years later. Peer pressure was reported in terms of meeting certain desirable image characteristics and not in terms of direct pressure to smoke. Smoking was just one of many ways to create this image. It is suggested that education can incorporate peer pressure in a positive way by considering ways to change the “images” that energize certain behaviors, by introducing the learner to alternative ways to achieve the image and by alerting (immunizing) young people to the manipulative functions of image and peer pressure. 1984 American School Health Association

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)146-148
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of School Health
Volume54
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1984

Fingerprint

Longitudinal Studies
smoking
longitudinal study
Smoking
adolescent
energy
school grade
School Health Services
Smoke
Education
Pressure
Peer Influence
Cigarette Smoking
Longitudinal Study
Energy
Peers
health
school
education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Philosophy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Capturing the Energy of Peer Pressure : Insights from a Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Cigarette Smoking. / Newman, Ian M.

In: Journal of School Health, Vol. 54, No. 4, 04.1984, p. 146-148.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{f3e36dba62bb4fbfa8f139cb5f72a1b8,
title = "Capturing the Energy of Peer Pressure: Insights from a Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Cigarette Smoking",
abstract = "The effects of peer pressure on smoking behavior were described by subjects in a longitudinal study in the ninth grade, the 11th grade and 10 years later. Peer pressure was reported in terms of meeting certain desirable image characteristics and not in terms of direct pressure to smoke. Smoking was just one of many ways to create this image. It is suggested that education can incorporate peer pressure in a positive way by considering ways to change the “images” that energize certain behaviors, by introducing the learner to alternative ways to achieve the image and by alerting (immunizing) young people to the manipulative functions of image and peer pressure. 1984 American School Health Association",
author = "Newman, {Ian M.}",
year = "1984",
month = "4",
doi = "10.1111/j.1746-1561.1984.tb08797.x",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "54",
pages = "146--148",
journal = "Journal of School Health",
issn = "0022-4391",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Capturing the Energy of Peer Pressure

T2 - Insights from a Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Cigarette Smoking

AU - Newman, Ian M.

PY - 1984/4

Y1 - 1984/4

N2 - The effects of peer pressure on smoking behavior were described by subjects in a longitudinal study in the ninth grade, the 11th grade and 10 years later. Peer pressure was reported in terms of meeting certain desirable image characteristics and not in terms of direct pressure to smoke. Smoking was just one of many ways to create this image. It is suggested that education can incorporate peer pressure in a positive way by considering ways to change the “images” that energize certain behaviors, by introducing the learner to alternative ways to achieve the image and by alerting (immunizing) young people to the manipulative functions of image and peer pressure. 1984 American School Health Association

AB - The effects of peer pressure on smoking behavior were described by subjects in a longitudinal study in the ninth grade, the 11th grade and 10 years later. Peer pressure was reported in terms of meeting certain desirable image characteristics and not in terms of direct pressure to smoke. Smoking was just one of many ways to create this image. It is suggested that education can incorporate peer pressure in a positive way by considering ways to change the “images” that energize certain behaviors, by introducing the learner to alternative ways to achieve the image and by alerting (immunizing) young people to the manipulative functions of image and peer pressure. 1984 American School Health Association

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0021414197&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0021414197&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/j.1746-1561.1984.tb08797.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1746-1561.1984.tb08797.x

M3 - Article

C2 - 6562288

AN - SCOPUS:0021414197

VL - 54

SP - 146

EP - 148

JO - Journal of School Health

JF - Journal of School Health

SN - 0022-4391

IS - 4

ER -