Abstract

Nebraska has one of the highest numbers of refugees per capita in the U.S. A high number of Somalis have resettled in Nebraska due to job opportunities and the low cost of living. In this paper, we report the process and the results of a cervical and breast cancer education program for Somali women conducted through a collaboration among public health, academia, and community entities. The curriculum was built to be suitable for the literacy level and cultural values of this community. Topics include female reproductive anatomy; breast and cervical cancer knowledge and screening; hepatitis C and liver cancer; and preparing for a health screening visit. Two community members trained as lay health workers conducted a pilot and an actual education session. The 2-day education program was attended by 52 women. Qualitative data showed the intervention to be promising for this and other African refugee populations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)929-936
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Community Health
Volume43
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2018

Fingerprint

Refugees
refugee
cancer
Education
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms
Breast Neoplasms
community
cost of living
Neoplasms
education
Health
Liver Neoplasms
Hepatitis C
health
Early Detection of Cancer
Curriculum
contagious disease
Anatomy
Public Health
public health

Keywords

  • Cancer
  • Cancer prevention and screening
  • Education
  • Health disparities
  • Refugee

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Cancer Community Education in Somali Refugees in Nebraska. / Watanabe-Galloway, Shinobu; Alnaji, Nada; Grimm, Brandon L; Leypoldt, Melissa.

In: Journal of Community Health, Vol. 43, No. 5, 01.10.2018, p. 929-936.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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