Canadian Acute Respiratory Illness and Flu Scale (CARIFS: Development of a valid measure for childhood respiratory infections

Benjamin Jacobs, Nancy L. Young, Paul T. Dick, Moshe M. Ipp, Regina Dutkowski, H. Dele Davies, Joanne M. Langley, Saul Greenberg, Derek Stephens, Elaine E.L. Wang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

51 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although acute respiratory infection (ARI) is the most frequent clinical syndrome in childhood, there is no validated measure of its severity. Therefore a parental questionnaire was developed: the Canadian Acute Respiratory Illness Flu Scale (CARIFS). A process of item generation, item reduction, and scale construction resulted in a scale composed of 18 items covering three domains; symptoms (e.g., cough); function (e.g., play), and parental impact (e.g., clinginess). The validity of the scale was evaluated in a study of 220 children with ARI. Construct validity was assessed by comparing the CARIFS score with physician, nurse, and parental assessment of the child's health. Data were available from 206 children (94%). The CARIFS correlated well with measures of the construct (Spearman's correlations between 0.36 and 0.52). Responsiveness was shown, with 90% of children having a CARIFS score less than a quarter of its initial value, by the tenth day. Copyright (C) 2000 Elsevier Science Inc.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)793-799
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Clinical Epidemiology
Volume53
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2000

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Respiratory Tract Infections
Cough
Nurses
Physicians
Surveys and Questionnaires
Child Health

Keywords

  • Acute respiratory infection
  • Outpatients
  • Pediatrics
  • Questionnaires
  • Severity of illness index, Outcome assessment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology

Cite this

Canadian Acute Respiratory Illness and Flu Scale (CARIFS : Development of a valid measure for childhood respiratory infections. / Jacobs, Benjamin; Young, Nancy L.; Dick, Paul T.; Ipp, Moshe M.; Dutkowski, Regina; Davies, H. Dele; Langley, Joanne M.; Greenberg, Saul; Stephens, Derek; Wang, Elaine E.L.

In: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, Vol. 53, No. 8, 01.08.2000, p. 793-799.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Jacobs, B, Young, NL, Dick, PT, Ipp, MM, Dutkowski, R, Davies, HD, Langley, JM, Greenberg, S, Stephens, D & Wang, EEL 2000, 'Canadian Acute Respiratory Illness and Flu Scale (CARIFS: Development of a valid measure for childhood respiratory infections', Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, vol. 53, no. 8, pp. 793-799. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0895-4356(99)00238-3
Jacobs, Benjamin ; Young, Nancy L. ; Dick, Paul T. ; Ipp, Moshe M. ; Dutkowski, Regina ; Davies, H. Dele ; Langley, Joanne M. ; Greenberg, Saul ; Stephens, Derek ; Wang, Elaine E.L. / Canadian Acute Respiratory Illness and Flu Scale (CARIFS : Development of a valid measure for childhood respiratory infections. In: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology. 2000 ; Vol. 53, No. 8. pp. 793-799.
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