Can financial incentives reduce juvenile confinement levels? An evaluation of the Redeploy Illinois program

Gaylene S. Armstrong, Todd A. Armstrong, Vince J. Webb, Cassandra A. Atkin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: Assessments of ongoing fiscal restructuring of juvenile justice system processes and the impact such restructuring has on juvenile incarceration rates are limited. When impacts of fiscal restructuring efforts have been assessed, researchers have focused on systemic, macro level changes in incarceration rates but avoided more focused, micro level impacts. This study fills this knowledge gap by examining the recent implementation of the Redeploy Illinois program in two pilot sites. In the Redeploy Illinois program, financial incentives were provided to select counties to develop community based alternatives to incarceration. The goal was to alleviate over reliance on state funded residential facilities for evaluation and confinement purposes. Methods: Agency data were analyzed using qualitative methods to examine the effects of this change. Results: Results of this study demonstrated that counties participating in the pilot test of the Redeploy Illinois program were able to reduce their levels of juvenile commitment to the state. Peoria County exceeded their reduction benchmark for all but two years, and St. Clair County well exceed their reduction benchmark for all full calendar years subsequent to implementation. Conclusions: Findings are consistent with the limited literature exploring fiscal restructuring efforts designed to reduce county levels juvenile commitments.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)183-191
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Criminal Justice
Volume39
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2011

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Motivation
Benchmarking
restructuring
incentive
evaluation
Residential Facilities
Social Justice
commitment
knowledge gap
macro level
micro level
Research Personnel
qualitative method
justice
community

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Applied Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Law

Cite this

Can financial incentives reduce juvenile confinement levels? An evaluation of the Redeploy Illinois program. / Armstrong, Gaylene S.; Armstrong, Todd A.; Webb, Vince J.; Atkin, Cassandra A.

In: Journal of Criminal Justice, Vol. 39, No. 2, 01.03.2011, p. 183-191.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Armstrong, Gaylene S. ; Armstrong, Todd A. ; Webb, Vince J. ; Atkin, Cassandra A. / Can financial incentives reduce juvenile confinement levels? An evaluation of the Redeploy Illinois program. In: Journal of Criminal Justice. 2011 ; Vol. 39, No. 2. pp. 183-191.
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