Calcaneal acrometastasis from urothelial carcinoma of the ureter

A case report and literature review

Jonathan H. Ryder, Sean V McGarry, Jue Wang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: Ureteral cancer is a rare entity. Typical symptoms are painless hematuria as well as flank pain. Bone metastasis of ureteral cancer can occur in nearby bone structures, such as the spine, pelvis, and hip bone. Distal bone metastasis, such as that in the calcaneus bone, however, is rare. Case report: An 82-year-old woman presented to the orthopedic clinic at the university hospital with a 3-month history of left heel pain. A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of her foot demonstrated a calcaneal lytic lesion. A biopsy of the lytic lesion showed urothelial carcinoma with squamous differentiation. A computed tomography (CT) scan of the abdomen and pelvis showed left hydronephrosis and an obstructive mass in the left ureter, at the iliac crossing. The patient received combined therapy that included local radiation, bisphosphonate, and chemotherapy, with complete resolution of her cancer-related symptoms. However, she eventually died from the progressive disease, 20 months after the initial diagnosis. Conclusion: This case highlights the rare presentation of ureter cancer with an initial presentation of foot pain, secondary to calcaneal metastasis. Multimodality therapy provides effective palliation of symptoms and improved quality of life. We also reviewed the literature and discuss the clinical benefits of multidisciplinary cancer care in elderly patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)395-399
Number of pages5
JournalClinical Interventions in Aging
Volume8
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 11 2013

Fingerprint

Ureteral Neoplasms
Ureter
Carcinoma
Bone and Bones
Neoplasm Metastasis
Pelvis
Foot
Pelvic Bones
Flank Pain
Pain
Calcaneus
Heel
Hydronephrosis
Diphosphonates
Hematuria
Abdomen
Orthopedics
Squamous Cell Carcinoma
Neoplasms
Spine

Keywords

  • Calcaneal acrometastasis
  • Chemotherapy
  • Elderly
  • Multimodality therapy
  • Radiation
  • Urothelial carcinoma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

Calcaneal acrometastasis from urothelial carcinoma of the ureter : A case report and literature review. / Ryder, Jonathan H.; McGarry, Sean V; Wang, Jue.

In: Clinical Interventions in Aging, Vol. 8, 11.04.2013, p. 395-399.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{ca30f14624904f7e85c5aeec91bf82f1,
title = "Calcaneal acrometastasis from urothelial carcinoma of the ureter: A case report and literature review",
abstract = "Purpose: Ureteral cancer is a rare entity. Typical symptoms are painless hematuria as well as flank pain. Bone metastasis of ureteral cancer can occur in nearby bone structures, such as the spine, pelvis, and hip bone. Distal bone metastasis, such as that in the calcaneus bone, however, is rare. Case report: An 82-year-old woman presented to the orthopedic clinic at the university hospital with a 3-month history of left heel pain. A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of her foot demonstrated a calcaneal lytic lesion. A biopsy of the lytic lesion showed urothelial carcinoma with squamous differentiation. A computed tomography (CT) scan of the abdomen and pelvis showed left hydronephrosis and an obstructive mass in the left ureter, at the iliac crossing. The patient received combined therapy that included local radiation, bisphosphonate, and chemotherapy, with complete resolution of her cancer-related symptoms. However, she eventually died from the progressive disease, 20 months after the initial diagnosis. Conclusion: This case highlights the rare presentation of ureter cancer with an initial presentation of foot pain, secondary to calcaneal metastasis. Multimodality therapy provides effective palliation of symptoms and improved quality of life. We also reviewed the literature and discuss the clinical benefits of multidisciplinary cancer care in elderly patients.",
keywords = "Calcaneal acrometastasis, Chemotherapy, Elderly, Multimodality therapy, Radiation, Urothelial carcinoma",
author = "Ryder, {Jonathan H.} and McGarry, {Sean V} and Jue Wang",
year = "2013",
month = "4",
day = "11",
doi = "10.2147/CIA.S42056",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "8",
pages = "395--399",
journal = "Clinical Interventions in Aging",
issn = "1176-9092",
publisher = "Dove Medical Press Ltd.",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Calcaneal acrometastasis from urothelial carcinoma of the ureter

T2 - A case report and literature review

AU - Ryder, Jonathan H.

AU - McGarry, Sean V

AU - Wang, Jue

PY - 2013/4/11

Y1 - 2013/4/11

N2 - Purpose: Ureteral cancer is a rare entity. Typical symptoms are painless hematuria as well as flank pain. Bone metastasis of ureteral cancer can occur in nearby bone structures, such as the spine, pelvis, and hip bone. Distal bone metastasis, such as that in the calcaneus bone, however, is rare. Case report: An 82-year-old woman presented to the orthopedic clinic at the university hospital with a 3-month history of left heel pain. A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of her foot demonstrated a calcaneal lytic lesion. A biopsy of the lytic lesion showed urothelial carcinoma with squamous differentiation. A computed tomography (CT) scan of the abdomen and pelvis showed left hydronephrosis and an obstructive mass in the left ureter, at the iliac crossing. The patient received combined therapy that included local radiation, bisphosphonate, and chemotherapy, with complete resolution of her cancer-related symptoms. However, she eventually died from the progressive disease, 20 months after the initial diagnosis. Conclusion: This case highlights the rare presentation of ureter cancer with an initial presentation of foot pain, secondary to calcaneal metastasis. Multimodality therapy provides effective palliation of symptoms and improved quality of life. We also reviewed the literature and discuss the clinical benefits of multidisciplinary cancer care in elderly patients.

AB - Purpose: Ureteral cancer is a rare entity. Typical symptoms are painless hematuria as well as flank pain. Bone metastasis of ureteral cancer can occur in nearby bone structures, such as the spine, pelvis, and hip bone. Distal bone metastasis, such as that in the calcaneus bone, however, is rare. Case report: An 82-year-old woman presented to the orthopedic clinic at the university hospital with a 3-month history of left heel pain. A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of her foot demonstrated a calcaneal lytic lesion. A biopsy of the lytic lesion showed urothelial carcinoma with squamous differentiation. A computed tomography (CT) scan of the abdomen and pelvis showed left hydronephrosis and an obstructive mass in the left ureter, at the iliac crossing. The patient received combined therapy that included local radiation, bisphosphonate, and chemotherapy, with complete resolution of her cancer-related symptoms. However, she eventually died from the progressive disease, 20 months after the initial diagnosis. Conclusion: This case highlights the rare presentation of ureter cancer with an initial presentation of foot pain, secondary to calcaneal metastasis. Multimodality therapy provides effective palliation of symptoms and improved quality of life. We also reviewed the literature and discuss the clinical benefits of multidisciplinary cancer care in elderly patients.

KW - Calcaneal acrometastasis

KW - Chemotherapy

KW - Elderly

KW - Multimodality therapy

KW - Radiation

KW - Urothelial carcinoma

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84876232748&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84876232748&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.2147/CIA.S42056

DO - 10.2147/CIA.S42056

M3 - Article

VL - 8

SP - 395

EP - 399

JO - Clinical Interventions in Aging

JF - Clinical Interventions in Aging

SN - 1176-9092

ER -