Bringing the parents back in

The effect of social origins on sectoral allocation and earnings

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Research on the effect of family origin, especially sectoral origin, on sectoral allocation and the process of earnings determination is virtually nonexistent. This paper attempts to fill this gap. A logit analysis of OCG-II data reveals that father’s sector of employment (but not his occupational status or education) affects son’s placement in the dual economic structure such that men whose fathers work in the core are significantly more likely to be allocated to this sector. It is also shown that father’s sector of employment and occupational status have significant effects on earnings of sons and that father’s sector is a stronger predictor of earnings than respondent’s sector. Finally, it is argued that economic structure plays an important role in the intergenerational transmission of opportunity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)31-47
Number of pages17
JournalSociological Focus
Volume23
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1990
Externally publishedYes

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Fathers
father
parents
Parents
occupational status
economic structure
Nuclear Family
occupational education
Economics
Education
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences(all)
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Bringing the parents back in : The effect of social origins on sectoral allocation and earnings. / Siahpush, Mohammad.

In: Sociological Focus, Vol. 23, No. 1, 1990, p. 31-47.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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