Breast Cancer Survival among African-Americans Living in the Midwest: Disparities and Recommendations to Decrease Mortality

Jackie Hill, Shinobu Watanabe-Galloway, Valerie Shostrom, Phyllis Nsiah-Kumi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Socioeconomic status is highly correlated with breast cancer risk and outcomes. Omaha, Nebraska has the third highest African-American poverty rate of the 100 largest U.S. metropolitan areas. Access to healthcare is a major issue in this community. This study analyzed the state cancer registry data to establish a baseline for breast cancer survivorship among African-American women in Nebraska. Specifically, the study examined the 5-year survivorship difference between African-American women and White women and the factors associated with poor survival. It was found that the 5-year survival rate for African-American women was 43% compared to 75% for White women and that this disparity persisted after taking into consideration the staging differences. The multivariable analysis results indicated that in addition to being African-American, increasing age, late-stage diagnosis, and lower socioeconomic status were factors independently associated with reduced survival in this sample. Because of the younger age at diagnosis among African-American women, we recommend that health promotion and educational programs be directed toward younger women. A significantly larger proportion of African-Americans being diagnosed at a late stage also underscores the importance of education of women of all ages. Future research should examine quality and timing of treatment as well as comorbidity issues affecting African-American women.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)8-14
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of National Black Nurses' Association : JNBNA
Volume26
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jul 1 2015

Fingerprint

African Americans
Breast Neoplasms
Survival
Mortality
Survival Rate
Social Class
Delayed Diagnosis
Women's Health
Poverty
Health Promotion
Registries
Comorbidity
Delivery of Health Care
Education
Neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Breast Cancer Survival among African-Americans Living in the Midwest : Disparities and Recommendations to Decrease Mortality. / Hill, Jackie; Watanabe-Galloway, Shinobu; Shostrom, Valerie; Nsiah-Kumi, Phyllis.

In: Journal of National Black Nurses' Association : JNBNA, Vol. 26, No. 1, 01.07.2015, p. 8-14.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{ac7d41dc84934c82a710784ff7bcb5e8,
title = "Breast Cancer Survival among African-Americans Living in the Midwest: Disparities and Recommendations to Decrease Mortality",
abstract = "Socioeconomic status is highly correlated with breast cancer risk and outcomes. Omaha, Nebraska has the third highest African-American poverty rate of the 100 largest U.S. metropolitan areas. Access to healthcare is a major issue in this community. This study analyzed the state cancer registry data to establish a baseline for breast cancer survivorship among African-American women in Nebraska. Specifically, the study examined the 5-year survivorship difference between African-American women and White women and the factors associated with poor survival. It was found that the 5-year survival rate for African-American women was 43{\%} compared to 75{\%} for White women and that this disparity persisted after taking into consideration the staging differences. The multivariable analysis results indicated that in addition to being African-American, increasing age, late-stage diagnosis, and lower socioeconomic status were factors independently associated with reduced survival in this sample. Because of the younger age at diagnosis among African-American women, we recommend that health promotion and educational programs be directed toward younger women. A significantly larger proportion of African-Americans being diagnosed at a late stage also underscores the importance of education of women of all ages. Future research should examine quality and timing of treatment as well as comorbidity issues affecting African-American women.",
author = "Jackie Hill and Shinobu Watanabe-Galloway and Valerie Shostrom and Phyllis Nsiah-Kumi",
year = "2015",
month = "7",
day = "1",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "26",
pages = "8--14",
journal = "Journal of National Black Nurses' Association : JNBNA",
issn = "0885-6028",
publisher = "The National Black Nurses' Association, Inc.",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Breast Cancer Survival among African-Americans Living in the Midwest

T2 - Disparities and Recommendations to Decrease Mortality

AU - Hill, Jackie

AU - Watanabe-Galloway, Shinobu

AU - Shostrom, Valerie

AU - Nsiah-Kumi, Phyllis

PY - 2015/7/1

Y1 - 2015/7/1

N2 - Socioeconomic status is highly correlated with breast cancer risk and outcomes. Omaha, Nebraska has the third highest African-American poverty rate of the 100 largest U.S. metropolitan areas. Access to healthcare is a major issue in this community. This study analyzed the state cancer registry data to establish a baseline for breast cancer survivorship among African-American women in Nebraska. Specifically, the study examined the 5-year survivorship difference between African-American women and White women and the factors associated with poor survival. It was found that the 5-year survival rate for African-American women was 43% compared to 75% for White women and that this disparity persisted after taking into consideration the staging differences. The multivariable analysis results indicated that in addition to being African-American, increasing age, late-stage diagnosis, and lower socioeconomic status were factors independently associated with reduced survival in this sample. Because of the younger age at diagnosis among African-American women, we recommend that health promotion and educational programs be directed toward younger women. A significantly larger proportion of African-Americans being diagnosed at a late stage also underscores the importance of education of women of all ages. Future research should examine quality and timing of treatment as well as comorbidity issues affecting African-American women.

AB - Socioeconomic status is highly correlated with breast cancer risk and outcomes. Omaha, Nebraska has the third highest African-American poverty rate of the 100 largest U.S. metropolitan areas. Access to healthcare is a major issue in this community. This study analyzed the state cancer registry data to establish a baseline for breast cancer survivorship among African-American women in Nebraska. Specifically, the study examined the 5-year survivorship difference between African-American women and White women and the factors associated with poor survival. It was found that the 5-year survival rate for African-American women was 43% compared to 75% for White women and that this disparity persisted after taking into consideration the staging differences. The multivariable analysis results indicated that in addition to being African-American, increasing age, late-stage diagnosis, and lower socioeconomic status were factors independently associated with reduced survival in this sample. Because of the younger age at diagnosis among African-American women, we recommend that health promotion and educational programs be directed toward younger women. A significantly larger proportion of African-Americans being diagnosed at a late stage also underscores the importance of education of women of all ages. Future research should examine quality and timing of treatment as well as comorbidity issues affecting African-American women.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84946398895&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84946398895&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 26371355

AN - SCOPUS:84946398895

VL - 26

SP - 8

EP - 14

JO - Journal of National Black Nurses' Association : JNBNA

JF - Journal of National Black Nurses' Association : JNBNA

SN - 0885-6028

IS - 1

ER -