Bone graft and bone graft substitutes in spine surgery: Current concepts and controversies

Gregory Grabowski, Chris Alan Cornett

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

81 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Iliac crest bone graft has long been the standard adjunct used in spine fusion surgery. This graft provides osteogenic, osteoinductive, and osteoconductive elements that aid in creation of a fusion mass. However, morbidity associated with bone graft harvest has led surgeons to seek other potential adjuncts, including bone morphogenetic proteins, demineralized bone matrix, and graft expanders such as synthetic bone graft and allograft. Knowledge of fusion biology is required to understand the benefits and limitations of these agents, which promote fusion via one of four mechanisms: osteogenesis, osteoinduction, osteoconduction, and osteopromotion. Although bone morphogenetic proteins have shown a clear ability to aid in bone formation and successful fusion, recent concern regarding their safety has tempered enthusiasm regarding their use.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)51-60
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons
Volume21
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2013

Fingerprint

Bone Substitutes
Spine
Transplants
Bone and Bones
Bone Morphogenetic Proteins
Osteogenesis
Bone Matrix
Bone Regeneration
Allografts
Morbidity
Safety

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

Bone graft and bone graft substitutes in spine surgery : Current concepts and controversies. / Grabowski, Gregory; Cornett, Chris Alan.

In: Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, Vol. 21, No. 1, 01.01.2013, p. 51-60.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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