Biological events

Robert G. Darling, Jon B. Woods, Theodore J. Cieslak

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Biological warfare has been a threat to humanity since ancient times and crude attempts at bioterrorism have been a growing concern for several decades. In June of 1999, U.S. public health experts met at CDC headquarters and used this rationale to develop a list of critical biological agents for health preparedness. Category A agents are those that, if released effectively, would be expected to have a high overall public health impact. Category B agents present a somewhat lesser requirement for preparedness, whereas category C agents require vigilance to guard against their future development as threat agents, but can be adequately managed within the framework of the existing public health infrastructure. To understand current biological warfare medical countermeasures research strategy and progress within the United States, it is useful to review weapons of mass destruction (WMD) medical countermeasure research programs led by Department of Defense, and the Department of Homeland Security.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationKoenig and schultz's Disaster Medicine
Subtitle of host publicationComprehensive Principles and Practices
PublisherCambridge University Press
Pages454-476
Number of pages23
ISBN (Electronic)9780511902482
ISBN (Print)9780521873673
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2009

Fingerprint

Biological Warfare
Public Health
Biomedical Research
Weapons of Mass Destruction
Bioterrorism
Biological Factors
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)
Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Darling, R. G., Woods, J. B., & Cieslak, T. J. (2009). Biological events. In Koenig and schultz's Disaster Medicine: Comprehensive Principles and Practices (pp. 454-476). Cambridge University Press. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511902482.031

Biological events. / Darling, Robert G.; Woods, Jon B.; Cieslak, Theodore J.

Koenig and schultz's Disaster Medicine: Comprehensive Principles and Practices. Cambridge University Press, 2009. p. 454-476.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Darling, RG, Woods, JB & Cieslak, TJ 2009, Biological events. in Koenig and schultz's Disaster Medicine: Comprehensive Principles and Practices. Cambridge University Press, pp. 454-476. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511902482.031
Darling RG, Woods JB, Cieslak TJ. Biological events. In Koenig and schultz's Disaster Medicine: Comprehensive Principles and Practices. Cambridge University Press. 2009. p. 454-476 https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511902482.031
Darling, Robert G. ; Woods, Jon B. ; Cieslak, Theodore J. / Biological events. Koenig and schultz's Disaster Medicine: Comprehensive Principles and Practices. Cambridge University Press, 2009. pp. 454-476
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