Biologic instability of pancreatic cancer xenografts in the nude mouse

Bruno M. Schmied, Alexis B. Ulrich, Hosei Matsuzaki, Tarek H. El-Metwally, Xianzhong Ding, Mirabella E. Fernandes, Thomas E. Adrian, William G Chaney, Surinder Kumar Batra, Parviz M. Pour

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Abstract

Tumor transplants into nude mice (NM) may reveal abnormal biological behavior compared with the original tumor. Despite this, human tumor xenografts in NM have been widely used to study the biology of tumors and to establish diagnostic and therapeutic modalities. Clearly, precise differences in the biology of a given tumor in human and in NM cannot be assessed. We compared the growth kinetics, differentiation pattern and karyotype of an anaplastic Syrian hamster pancreatic cancer cell line in NM and in allogenic hamsters, As with the original tumor, transplants in hamsters grew fast, were anaplastic and expressed markers related to tumor malignancy like galectin 3, TGF-α and its receptor EGFR at high levels. However, tumors in the NM were well-differentiated adenocarcinomas, grew slower, had increased apoptotic rate and had a high expression of differentiation markers such as blood group A antigen, DU-PAN-2, carbonic anhydrase II, TGF-β2 and mucin. Karyotypically, the tumors in the NM acquired additional chromosomal damage. Our results demonstrate significant differences in the morphology and biology of tumors grown in NM and the allogenic host, and call for caution in extrapolating data obtained from xenografts to primary cancer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1121-1127
Number of pages7
JournalCarcinogenesis
Volume21
Issue number6
StatePublished - Jun 30 2000

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Pancreatic Neoplasms
Heterografts
Nude Mice
Neoplasms
Cricetinae
Mucin-2
Carbonic Anhydrase II
Galectin 3
Transplants
Differentiation Antigens
Mesocricetus
Blood Group Antigens
Karyotype
Adenocarcinoma
Cell Line

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Schmied, B. M., Ulrich, A. B., Matsuzaki, H., El-Metwally, T. H., Ding, X., Fernandes, M. E., ... Pour, P. M. (2000). Biologic instability of pancreatic cancer xenografts in the nude mouse. Carcinogenesis, 21(6), 1121-1127.

Biologic instability of pancreatic cancer xenografts in the nude mouse. / Schmied, Bruno M.; Ulrich, Alexis B.; Matsuzaki, Hosei; El-Metwally, Tarek H.; Ding, Xianzhong; Fernandes, Mirabella E.; Adrian, Thomas E.; Chaney, William G; Batra, Surinder Kumar; Pour, Parviz M.

In: Carcinogenesis, Vol. 21, No. 6, 30.06.2000, p. 1121-1127.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Schmied, BM, Ulrich, AB, Matsuzaki, H, El-Metwally, TH, Ding, X, Fernandes, ME, Adrian, TE, Chaney, WG, Batra, SK & Pour, PM 2000, 'Biologic instability of pancreatic cancer xenografts in the nude mouse', Carcinogenesis, vol. 21, no. 6, pp. 1121-1127.
Schmied BM, Ulrich AB, Matsuzaki H, El-Metwally TH, Ding X, Fernandes ME et al. Biologic instability of pancreatic cancer xenografts in the nude mouse. Carcinogenesis. 2000 Jun 30;21(6):1121-1127.
Schmied, Bruno M. ; Ulrich, Alexis B. ; Matsuzaki, Hosei ; El-Metwally, Tarek H. ; Ding, Xianzhong ; Fernandes, Mirabella E. ; Adrian, Thomas E. ; Chaney, William G ; Batra, Surinder Kumar ; Pour, Parviz M. / Biologic instability of pancreatic cancer xenografts in the nude mouse. In: Carcinogenesis. 2000 ; Vol. 21, No. 6. pp. 1121-1127.
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