Benefits of small-sized caches for scatter-hoarding rodents: Influence of cache size, depth, and soil moisture

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Some granivorous rodents scatter hoard; they bury seeds in shallow pits throughout their territory. These buried caches can represent food stores for the hoarders, food for competitors, or a means of seed dispersal and propagation for plants. Large numbers of seeds may be buried in many caches throughout an area; thus, fate of caches has important consequences for granivores, other animals, and plants. This study examined the ability of Ord's kangaroo rat (Dipodomys ordii) to exploit artificial caches of different sizes, at 2 depths, and in substrates of differing moisture content. Kangaroo rats harvested significantly more caches in moist substrates and at shallower depths; however, small caches containing ≤5 seeds were removed infrequently by individuals regardless of substrate moisture and depth. As cache size was increased in moist sand, a threshold existed at each depth where caches were greatly exploited by kangaroo rats. Results suggest that pilferage of caches under natural conditions is not linear with respect to cache size in moist substrates. As cache size was increased in dry sand, no threshold of increased exploitation was observed for cache sizes used in this experiment. Results also suggest that pilferage of caches under natural conditions is not strongly influenced by size in dry substrates for relatively small caches. Overall, size and depth of caches greatly influence their fate. Perturbations, such as rainfall, also alter detection of caches. To reduce detection of caches by competitors, scatter hoarders should distribute relatively small caches, especially during wet conditions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1186-1192
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Mammalogy
Volume86
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2005

Fingerprint

Dipodomys
caching
rodent
Rodentia
rodents
Soil
soil moisture
soil water
Seeds
substrate
Seed Dispersal
Food
seeds
Aptitude
sand
seed
plant propagation
wet environmental conditions
food storage
seed propagation

Keywords

  • Cache fate
  • Cache size
  • Dipodomys ordii
  • Plant-animal interactions
  • Scatter hoarding

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Ecology
  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Genetics
  • Nature and Landscape Conservation

Cite this

Benefits of small-sized caches for scatter-hoarding rodents : Influence of cache size, depth, and soil moisture. / Geluso, Keith.

In: Journal of Mammalogy, Vol. 86, No. 6, 01.12.2005, p. 1186-1192.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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