Behavior of buff-breasted sandpipers (Tryngites subruficollis) during migratory stopover in agricultural fields

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Understanding the behavior of birds in agricultural habitats can be the first step in evaluating the conservation implications of birds' use of landscapes shaped by modern agriculture. The existence and magnitude of risk from agricultural practices and the quality of resources agricultural lands provide will be determined largely by how birds use these habitats. Buff-breasted Sandpipers (Tryngites subruficollis) are a species of conservation concern. During spring migration large numbers of Buff-breasted Sandpipers stopover in row crop fields in the Rainwater Basin region of Nebraska. We used behavioral observations as a first step in evaluating how Buff-breasted Sandpipers use crop fields during migratory stopover. Methodology/Principal Findings: We measured behavior during migratory stopover using scan and focal individual sampling to determine how birds were using crop fields. Foraging was the most frequent behavior observed, but the intensity of foraging changed over the course of the day with a distinct mid-day low point. Relative to other migrating shorebirds, Buff-breasted Sandpipers spent a significant proportion of their time in social interactions including courtship displays. Conclusions/Significance: Our results show that the primary use of upland agricultural fields by migrating Buff-breasted Sandpipers is foraging while wetlands are used for maintenance and resting. The importance of foraging in row crop fields suggests that both the quality of food resources available in fields and the possible risks from dietary exposure to agricultural chemicals will be important to consider when developing conservation plans for Buff-breasted Sandpipers migrating through the Great Plains.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere8000
JournalPloS one
Volume4
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 24 2009

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Scolopacidae
Birds
Crops
field crops
Conservation
foraging
Ecosystem
birds
Agrochemicals
Courtship
Food Quality
Wetlands
Interpersonal Relations
Agriculture
dietary exposure
Display devices
Maintenance
agrochemicals
migratory behavior
Sampling

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • General

Cite this

Behavior of buff-breasted sandpipers (Tryngites subruficollis) during migratory stopover in agricultural fields. / McCarty, John P; Jorgensen, Joel G.; Wolfenbarger, Lillian LaReesa.

In: PloS one, Vol. 4, No. 11, e8000, 24.11.2009.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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