Beginning a patient-centered approach in the design of a diabetes prevention program

Richard W. Seidel, Kimberlee A. Pardo, Paul A Estabrooks, Wen You, Sarah S. Wall, Brenda M. Davy, Fabio Almeida

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The purpose of this study was to identify patient preferences for different components of a local diabetes prevention program that would improve reach. A secondary purpose was to determine if patient characteristics were related to program preferences. Methods: Participants were identified through electronic medical records from two family medicine clinics in Virginia. Participants completed a mailed survey addressing demographics, economic status, risk factors for diabetes, and preferences regarding diabetes prevention interventions-delivery mode, program length, and duration. Results: Twenty-nine percent of eligible participants responded (n = 142); 83% of participants were at risk for diabetes and 82% had a household income <$20,000. When presented with the choice between a class-based vs. a technology-based program, 83% preferred a technology-based program. Whites were less likely to choose the technology-based program, with no significant differences based on age, education, income, or gender. Conclusions: Contrary to beliefs that lower income individuals may not use technology-based interventions, lower socioeconomic patients indicated a preference for a technology- and telephone-supported diabetes prevention program over in-person class approaches. Findings provide formative data to support the design of a patient-centered, technology-enhanced diabetes prevention program in a real-world setting, thereby increasing potential participation and reach.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2003-2013
Number of pages11
JournalInternational journal of environmental research and public health
Volume11
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 14 2014

Fingerprint

Technology
Patient Preference
Electronic Health Records
Telephone
Economics
Medicine
Demography
Education

Keywords

  • Diabetes prevention program
  • Low income populations
  • Patient preferences
  • Technology-enhanced intervention

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

Cite this

Beginning a patient-centered approach in the design of a diabetes prevention program. / Seidel, Richard W.; Pardo, Kimberlee A.; Estabrooks, Paul A; You, Wen; Wall, Sarah S.; Davy, Brenda M.; Almeida, Fabio.

In: International journal of environmental research and public health, Vol. 11, No. 2, 14.02.2014, p. 2003-2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Seidel, Richard W. ; Pardo, Kimberlee A. ; Estabrooks, Paul A ; You, Wen ; Wall, Sarah S. ; Davy, Brenda M. ; Almeida, Fabio. / Beginning a patient-centered approach in the design of a diabetes prevention program. In: International journal of environmental research and public health. 2014 ; Vol. 11, No. 2. pp. 2003-2013.
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