Basic clinical and Laboratory features of filoviral hemorrhagic fever

Mark G Kortepeter, Daniel G. Bausch, Mike Bray

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

157 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The filoviruses Marburg and Ebola cause severe hemorrhagic fever (HF) in humans. Beginning with the 1967 Marburg outbreak, 30 epidemics, isolated cases, and accidental laboratory infections have been described in the medical literature. We reviewed those reports to determine the basic clinical and laboratory features of filoviral HF. The most detailed information was found in descriptions of patients treated in industrialized countries; except for the 2000 outbreak of Ebola Sudan HF in Uganda, reports of epidemics in central Africa provided little controlled or objective clinical data. Other than the case fatality rate, there were no clear differences in the features of the various filovirus infections. This compilation will be of value to medical workers responding to epidemics and to investigators attempting to develop animal models of filoviral HF. By identifying key unanswered questions and gaps in clinical data, it will help guide clinical research in future outbreaks.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume204
Issue numberSUPPL. 3
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2011
Externally publishedYes

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Disease Outbreaks
Fever
Ebola Hemorrhagic Fever
Laboratory Infection
Central Africa
Sudan
Uganda
Developed Countries
Animal Models
Research Personnel
Mortality
Infection
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Basic clinical and Laboratory features of filoviral hemorrhagic fever. / Kortepeter, Mark G; Bausch, Daniel G.; Bray, Mike.

In: Journal of Infectious Diseases, Vol. 204, No. SUPPL. 3, 01.11.2011.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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