Banf1 is required to maintain the self-renewal of both mouse and human embryonic stem cells

Jesse L. Cox, Sunil K. Mallanna, Briana D. Ormsbee, Michelle Desler, Matthew S Wiebe, A Angie Rizzino

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Self-renewal is a complex biological process necessary for maintaining the pluripotency of embryonic stem cells (ESCs). Recent studies have used global proteomic techniques to identify proteins that associate with the master regulators Oct4, Nanog and Sox2 in ESCs or in ESCs during the early stages of differentiation. Through an unbiased proteomic screen, Banf1 was identified as a Sox2- associated protein. Banf1 has been shown to be essential for worm and fly development but, until now, its role in mammalian development and ESCs has not been explored. In this study, we examined the effect of knocking down Banf1 on ESCs. We demonstrate that the knockdown of Banf1 promotes the differentiation of mouse ESCs and decreases the survival of both mouse and human ESCs. For mouse ESCs, we demonstrate that knocking down Banf1 promotes their differentiation into cells that exhibit markers primarily associated with mesoderm and trophectoderm. Interestingly, knockdown of Banf1 disrupts the survival of human ESCs without significantly reducing the expression levels of the master regulators Sox2, Oct4 and Nanog or inducing the expression of markers of differentiation. Furthermore, we determined that the knockdown of Banf1 alters the cell cycle distribution of both human and mouse ESCs by causing an uncharacteristic increase in the proportion of cells in the G2-M phase of the cell cycle.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2654-2665
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Cell Science
Volume124
Issue number15
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2011

Fingerprint

Embryonic Stem Cells
Proteomics
Cell Cycle
Biological Phenomena
G2 Phase
Differentiation Antigens
Mesoderm
Diptera
Cell Division
Cell Differentiation
Cell Survival
Proteins
Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells
Human Embryonic Stem Cells

Keywords

  • Banf1
  • Cell cycle
  • Embryonic stem cell
  • Self-renewal
  • Sox2

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Banf1 is required to maintain the self-renewal of both mouse and human embryonic stem cells. / Cox, Jesse L.; Mallanna, Sunil K.; Ormsbee, Briana D.; Desler, Michelle; Wiebe, Matthew S; Rizzino, A Angie.

In: Journal of Cell Science, Vol. 124, No. 15, 01.08.2011, p. 2654-2665.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cox, Jesse L. ; Mallanna, Sunil K. ; Ormsbee, Briana D. ; Desler, Michelle ; Wiebe, Matthew S ; Rizzino, A Angie. / Banf1 is required to maintain the self-renewal of both mouse and human embryonic stem cells. In: Journal of Cell Science. 2011 ; Vol. 124, No. 15. pp. 2654-2665.
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