B and T cell lymphomas. Analysis of blood and lymph nodes in 87 patients

Kazimiera J. Gajl-Peczalska, Clara D. Bloomfield, Peter F. Coccia, Henry Sosin, Richard D. Brunning, John H. Kersey

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Abstract

B and T cell populations were studied in blood and neoplastic tissues from 64 untreated and 23 treated patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. This study was undertaken primarily to evaluate the relation of B and T cell markers in various lymphomas to the currently accepted morphologic classifications and to determine the utility of various tissues in defining the cell of origin of a lymphoma. When histologically involved blood, bone marrow, lymph nodes or body fluids were studied, a B or T cell origin of the lymphoma was identified in 26 of 28 (68 per cent) patients. A B cell origin was found in 17 adults classified as having nodular (N) or diffuse (D) poorly differentiated lymphocytic lymphoma (PDLL). One lymphoma of T cell origin was observed in an adult with poorly differentiated lymphocytic lymphoma-diffuse (PDLL-D). In contrast, all cases of PDLL-D in children were T cell in origin. The origin of American Burkitt's (stem cell) lymphoma in two children was the B cell. When histologically involved blood was studied, a B or T cell origin was demonstrated in 10 of 21 (48 per cent) adults. Evidence of a monoclonal proliferation of B lymphocytes in the blood was found two adults with more than 7 per cent lymphoma cells in Wright-Giemsa stained blood smears. When neoplastic lymph nodes were studied, the diagnosis of a B cell lymphoma was made in 8 of 12 (67 per cent) adults. Study of surface markers on malignant cells in cerebrospinal or serosal fluids frequently revealed a B or T cell origin of the lymphoma. B and T lymphocyte numbers in the blood did not correlate with immunoglobulin or skin test abnormalities. Abnormalities in circulating B or T cell percentages at diagnosis were a poor prognostic sign in patients with PDLL-D.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)674-685
Number of pages12
JournalThe American journal of medicine
Volume59
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1975

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T-Cell Lymphoma
B-Cell Lymphoma
B-Lymphocytes
Lymph Nodes
T-Lymphocytes
Lymphoma
Mantle-Cell Lymphoma
B-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia
Skin Abnormalities
Lymphocyte Count
Body Fluids
Skin Tests
Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma
Immunoglobulins
Stem Cells
Bone Marrow

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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Gajl-Peczalska, K. J., Bloomfield, C. D., Coccia, P. F., Sosin, H., Brunning, R. D., & Kersey, J. H. (1975). B and T cell lymphomas. Analysis of blood and lymph nodes in 87 patients. The American journal of medicine, 59(5), 674-685. https://doi.org/10.1016/0002-9343(75)90228-4

B and T cell lymphomas. Analysis of blood and lymph nodes in 87 patients. / Gajl-Peczalska, Kazimiera J.; Bloomfield, Clara D.; Coccia, Peter F.; Sosin, Henry; Brunning, Richard D.; Kersey, John H.

In: The American journal of medicine, Vol. 59, No. 5, 11.1975, p. 674-685.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gajl-Peczalska, KJ, Bloomfield, CD, Coccia, PF, Sosin, H, Brunning, RD & Kersey, JH 1975, 'B and T cell lymphomas. Analysis of blood and lymph nodes in 87 patients', The American journal of medicine, vol. 59, no. 5, pp. 674-685. https://doi.org/10.1016/0002-9343(75)90228-4
Gajl-Peczalska KJ, Bloomfield CD, Coccia PF, Sosin H, Brunning RD, Kersey JH. B and T cell lymphomas. Analysis of blood and lymph nodes in 87 patients. The American journal of medicine. 1975 Nov;59(5):674-685. https://doi.org/10.1016/0002-9343(75)90228-4
Gajl-Peczalska, Kazimiera J. ; Bloomfield, Clara D. ; Coccia, Peter F. ; Sosin, Henry ; Brunning, Richard D. ; Kersey, John H. / B and T cell lymphomas. Analysis of blood and lymph nodes in 87 patients. In: The American journal of medicine. 1975 ; Vol. 59, No. 5. pp. 674-685.
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