Availability and fractionation of phosphorus in sewage sludge-amended soils

M. Akhtar, D. L. McCallister, Kent M Eskridge

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A laboratory incubation study was conducted with the objective of determining the effects of time, temperature, and soil properties on availability and chemical fractions of phosphorus (P) in sewage sludge-amended soils. Anaerobically digested sewage sludge was mixed with three soils (Crofton silty clay loam, Moody silty clay loam, and Thurman sandy loam) at a rate equivalent to 80 Mg sludge ha-1. The mixtures were incubated at 25 and 37°C for up to 120 days. Phosphorus in sewage sludge-treated soils was extracted with iron-oxide impregnated filter paper strips (strip-P). Phosphorus also was fractionated chemically into four components by sequential extraction. Phosphorus concentration in all fractions increased with sludge application. Strip-P concentration was higher at 25°C in all soils than at 37°C over the entire period of incubation. Soluble-P was greatest in sandy Thurman soil at both temperatures over all incubation times. A sharp increase in non-occluded P (NOC-P) concentration occurred in all soils with time at both temperatures. Occluded P (OC-P) in all soils decreased more rapidly with time at 37°C than at 25°C. Calcium-P (Ca-P) concentration was unaffected by time and was highest in calcareous Crofton soil. Soil texture and the presence of carbonates strongly influence the fate of P from applied sewage sludge. It was concluded, based on time trends that sludge as a P source on a P-limited soil should be applied well before the period of maximum plant demand. Elevated temperature (37°C) typical of mid-summer, promotes depletion of more available (strip-P and soluble P) fractions compared with lower temperature (25°C).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2057-2068
Number of pages12
JournalCommunications in Soil Science and Plant Analysis
Volume33
Issue number13-14
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2002

Fingerprint

Sewage sludge
sewage sludge
Fractionation
Phosphorus
fractionation
Availability
phosphorus
Soils
sludge
soil
silty clay loam
temperature
incubation
iron oxides
calcareous soils
soil texture
calcareous soil
sandy soils
carbonates
sandy loam

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agronomy and Crop Science
  • Soil Science

Cite this

Availability and fractionation of phosphorus in sewage sludge-amended soils. / Akhtar, M.; McCallister, D. L.; Eskridge, Kent M.

In: Communications in Soil Science and Plant Analysis, Vol. 33, No. 13-14, 01.01.2002, p. 2057-2068.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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