Auditory thresholds in the American cockroach (Orthoptera: Blattidae): estimates using single-unit and compound-action potential recordings.

T. N. Decker, T. A. Jones, R. E. Gold

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent commercial suggestions that insect populations can be controlled through the use of ultrasound raises the question of whether or not certain insects have receptors that are sensitive to high-frequency sound. Single neural unit discharges and compound-action potentials were recorded from the ventral nerve cord in the American cockroach, Periplaneta americana L., to constant rise time tone pulses from 100 to 40,000 hertz (Hz). Unit responses and compound-action potentials show that the cockroach is insensitive to sound above approximately 3,000 Hz. Data relating latency of the response to intensity of the stimulus suggest that the cockroach cercal system operates on the principle of energy envelope detection. Decreases in latency likely occur primarily as a result of increases in the rate of membrane depolarization in cercal dendrites.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)687-691
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of economic entomology
Volume82
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1989

Fingerprint

Blattidae
cockroach
Periplaneta americana
action potentials
Blattodea
Orthoptera
ventral nerve cord
insects
dendrites
insect
receptors
energy
membrane
sound

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology
  • Insect Science

Cite this

Auditory thresholds in the American cockroach (Orthoptera : Blattidae): estimates using single-unit and compound-action potential recordings. / Decker, T. N.; Jones, T. A.; Gold, R. E.

In: Journal of economic entomology, Vol. 82, No. 3, 06.1989, p. 687-691.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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