Auditory brainstem responses in a case of high-frequency conductive hearing loss

Michael P Gorga, J. K. Reiland, K. A. Beauchaine

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Click-evoked auditory brainstem responses were measured in a patient with high-frequency conductive hearing loss. As is typical in cases of conductive hearing loss, Wave I latency was prolonged beyond normal limits. Interpeak latency differences were just below the lower limits of the normal range. The Wave V latency-intensity function, however, was abnormally steep. This pattern is explained by the hypothesis that the slope of the latency-intensity function is determined principally by the configuration of the hearing loss. In cases of high-frequency hearing loss (regardless of the etiology), the response may be dominated by more apical regions of the cochlea at lower intensities and thus have a longer latency.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)346-350
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Speech and Hearing Disorders
Volume50
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1985

Fingerprint

High-Frequency Hearing Loss
Conductive Hearing Loss
Brain Stem Auditory Evoked Potentials
Cochlea
Hearing Loss
Reference Values
etiology
Latency
Hearing Impairment
Hearing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

Auditory brainstem responses in a case of high-frequency conductive hearing loss. / Gorga, Michael P; Reiland, J. K.; Beauchaine, K. A.

In: Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, Vol. 50, No. 4, 01.01.1985, p. 346-350.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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