Auditory brain stem responses to high-frequency tone bursts in normal-hearing subjects

Michael P Gorga, J. R. Kaminski, K. A. Beauchaine

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

ABR and behavioral thresholds and ABR latencies were measured from six normal-hearing subjects in response to tone bursts, having frequencies of 9, 000 to 16, 000 Hz. In general, ABR thresholds were higher than behavioral thresholds; however, the differences were typically less than those observed for lower frequencies. Wave V latency-intensity functions were less dependent on frequency for these stimuli than they were for lower frequency stimuli. This may be due to the fact that higher frequencies are represented over a very narrow area o! the cochlea and that minor variability in the measurement of latencies might obscure small differences in latency as a function of frequency. In general, these data suggest that ABRs can be measured in response to high-frequency stimuli and that these measurements may have clinical utility, especially when monitoring ototoxic effects in difficult-to-test patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)222-226
Number of pages5
JournalEar and hearing
Volume8
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1987

Fingerprint

Brain Stem Auditory Evoked Potentials
Cochlea
Hearing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology
  • Speech and Hearing

Cite this

Auditory brain stem responses to high-frequency tone bursts in normal-hearing subjects. / Gorga, Michael P; Kaminski, J. R.; Beauchaine, K. A.

In: Ear and hearing, Vol. 8, No. 4, 08.1987, p. 222-226.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gorga, Michael P ; Kaminski, J. R. ; Beauchaine, K. A. / Auditory brain stem responses to high-frequency tone bursts in normal-hearing subjects. In: Ear and hearing. 1987 ; Vol. 8, No. 4. pp. 222-226.
@article{9b4ef9b2759c45f289dd8fa99de08202,
title = "Auditory brain stem responses to high-frequency tone bursts in normal-hearing subjects",
abstract = "ABR and behavioral thresholds and ABR latencies were measured from six normal-hearing subjects in response to tone bursts, having frequencies of 9, 000 to 16, 000 Hz. In general, ABR thresholds were higher than behavioral thresholds; however, the differences were typically less than those observed for lower frequencies. Wave V latency-intensity functions were less dependent on frequency for these stimuli than they were for lower frequency stimuli. This may be due to the fact that higher frequencies are represented over a very narrow area o! the cochlea and that minor variability in the measurement of latencies might obscure small differences in latency as a function of frequency. In general, these data suggest that ABRs can be measured in response to high-frequency stimuli and that these measurements may have clinical utility, especially when monitoring ototoxic effects in difficult-to-test patients.",
author = "Gorga, {Michael P} and Kaminski, {J. R.} and Beauchaine, {K. A.}",
year = "1987",
month = "8",
doi = "10.1097/00003446-198708000-00006",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "8",
pages = "222--226",
journal = "Ear and Hearing",
issn = "0196-0202",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Auditory brain stem responses to high-frequency tone bursts in normal-hearing subjects

AU - Gorga, Michael P

AU - Kaminski, J. R.

AU - Beauchaine, K. A.

PY - 1987/8

Y1 - 1987/8

N2 - ABR and behavioral thresholds and ABR latencies were measured from six normal-hearing subjects in response to tone bursts, having frequencies of 9, 000 to 16, 000 Hz. In general, ABR thresholds were higher than behavioral thresholds; however, the differences were typically less than those observed for lower frequencies. Wave V latency-intensity functions were less dependent on frequency for these stimuli than they were for lower frequency stimuli. This may be due to the fact that higher frequencies are represented over a very narrow area o! the cochlea and that minor variability in the measurement of latencies might obscure small differences in latency as a function of frequency. In general, these data suggest that ABRs can be measured in response to high-frequency stimuli and that these measurements may have clinical utility, especially when monitoring ototoxic effects in difficult-to-test patients.

AB - ABR and behavioral thresholds and ABR latencies were measured from six normal-hearing subjects in response to tone bursts, having frequencies of 9, 000 to 16, 000 Hz. In general, ABR thresholds were higher than behavioral thresholds; however, the differences were typically less than those observed for lower frequencies. Wave V latency-intensity functions were less dependent on frequency for these stimuli than they were for lower frequency stimuli. This may be due to the fact that higher frequencies are represented over a very narrow area o! the cochlea and that minor variability in the measurement of latencies might obscure small differences in latency as a function of frequency. In general, these data suggest that ABRs can be measured in response to high-frequency stimuli and that these measurements may have clinical utility, especially when monitoring ototoxic effects in difficult-to-test patients.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0023388517&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0023388517&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/00003446-198708000-00006

DO - 10.1097/00003446-198708000-00006

M3 - Article

C2 - 3653535

AN - SCOPUS:0023388517

VL - 8

SP - 222

EP - 226

JO - Ear and Hearing

JF - Ear and Hearing

SN - 0196-0202

IS - 4

ER -