Atypical presentations of intracranial hypotension

Comparison with classic spontaneous intracranial hypotension

A. A. Capizzano, L. Lai, J. Kim, Matthew Rizzo, L. Gray, M. K. Smoot, T. Moritani

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Atypical clinical presentations of spontaneous intracranial hypotension include obtundation, memory deficits, dementia with frontotemporal features, parkinsonism, and ataxia. The purpose of this study was to compare clinical and imaging features of spontaneous intracranial hypotension with typical-versus-atypical presentations. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Clinical records and neuroimaging of patients with spontaneous intracranial hypotension from September 2005 to August 2014 were retrospectively evaluated. Patients with classic spontaneous intracranial hypotension (n=33; mean age, 41.7=14.3 years) were compared with those with intracranial hypotension with atypical clinical presentation (n=8; mean age, 55.9=14.1 years) and 36 controls (mean age, 41.4=11.2 years). RESULTS: Patients with atypical spontaneous intracranial hypotension were older than those with classic spontaneous intracranial hypotension (55.9=14.1 years versus 41.7=14.3 years; P<.018). Symptom duration was shorter in classic compared with atypical spontaneous intracranial hypotension (3.78=7.18 months versus 21.93=18.43 months; P<.015). There was no significant difference in dural enhancement, subdural hematomas, or cerebellar tonsil herniation. Patients with atypical spontaneous intracranial hypotension had significantly more elongated anteroposterior midbrain diameter compared with those with classic spontaneous intracranial hypotension (33.6=2.9 mm versus 27.3=2.9 mm; P<.001) and shortened pontomammillary distance (2.8=1 mm versus 5.15=1.5 mm; P<.001). Patients with atypical spontaneous intracranial hypotension were less likely to become symptom-free, regardless of treatment, compared with those with classic spontaneous intracranial hypotension (2 13.99, P<.001). CONCLUSIONS: In this sample of 8 patients, atypical spontaneous intracranial hypotension was a more chronic syndrome compared with classic spontaneous intracranial hypotension, with more severe brain sagging, lower rates of clinical response, and frequent relapses. Awareness of atypical presentations of spontaneous intracranial hypotension is paramount.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1256-1261
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Neuroradiology
Volume37
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2016

Fingerprint

Intracranial Hypotension
Encephalocele
Frontotemporal Dementia
Subdural Hematoma
Palatine Tonsil

Keywords

  • AP=average anteroposterior midbrain diameter
  • FBSS=frontotemporal brain sagging syndrome
  • PM=pontomammillary distance
  • SIH=spontaneous intracranial hypotension

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Atypical presentations of intracranial hypotension : Comparison with classic spontaneous intracranial hypotension. / Capizzano, A. A.; Lai, L.; Kim, J.; Rizzo, Matthew; Gray, L.; Smoot, M. K.; Moritani, T.

In: American Journal of Neuroradiology, Vol. 37, No. 7, 01.07.2016, p. 1256-1261.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Capizzano, A. A. ; Lai, L. ; Kim, J. ; Rizzo, Matthew ; Gray, L. ; Smoot, M. K. ; Moritani, T. / Atypical presentations of intracranial hypotension : Comparison with classic spontaneous intracranial hypotension. In: American Journal of Neuroradiology. 2016 ; Vol. 37, No. 7. pp. 1256-1261.
@article{689d0bc9ace345b19d873274d38ff1d4,
title = "Atypical presentations of intracranial hypotension: Comparison with classic spontaneous intracranial hypotension",
abstract = "BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Atypical clinical presentations of spontaneous intracranial hypotension include obtundation, memory deficits, dementia with frontotemporal features, parkinsonism, and ataxia. The purpose of this study was to compare clinical and imaging features of spontaneous intracranial hypotension with typical-versus-atypical presentations. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Clinical records and neuroimaging of patients with spontaneous intracranial hypotension from September 2005 to August 2014 were retrospectively evaluated. Patients with classic spontaneous intracranial hypotension (n=33; mean age, 41.7=14.3 years) were compared with those with intracranial hypotension with atypical clinical presentation (n=8; mean age, 55.9=14.1 years) and 36 controls (mean age, 41.4=11.2 years). RESULTS: Patients with atypical spontaneous intracranial hypotension were older than those with classic spontaneous intracranial hypotension (55.9=14.1 years versus 41.7=14.3 years; P<.018). Symptom duration was shorter in classic compared with atypical spontaneous intracranial hypotension (3.78=7.18 months versus 21.93=18.43 months; P<.015). There was no significant difference in dural enhancement, subdural hematomas, or cerebellar tonsil herniation. Patients with atypical spontaneous intracranial hypotension had significantly more elongated anteroposterior midbrain diameter compared with those with classic spontaneous intracranial hypotension (33.6=2.9 mm versus 27.3=2.9 mm; P<.001) and shortened pontomammillary distance (2.8=1 mm versus 5.15=1.5 mm; P<.001). Patients with atypical spontaneous intracranial hypotension were less likely to become symptom-free, regardless of treatment, compared with those with classic spontaneous intracranial hypotension (2 13.99, P<.001). CONCLUSIONS: In this sample of 8 patients, atypical spontaneous intracranial hypotension was a more chronic syndrome compared with classic spontaneous intracranial hypotension, with more severe brain sagging, lower rates of clinical response, and frequent relapses. Awareness of atypical presentations of spontaneous intracranial hypotension is paramount.",
keywords = "AP=average anteroposterior midbrain diameter, FBSS=frontotemporal brain sagging syndrome, PM=pontomammillary distance, SIH=spontaneous intracranial hypotension",
author = "Capizzano, {A. A.} and L. Lai and J. Kim and Matthew Rizzo and L. Gray and Smoot, {M. K.} and T. Moritani",
year = "2016",
month = "7",
day = "1",
doi = "10.3174/ajnr.A4706",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "37",
pages = "1256--1261",
journal = "American Journal of Neuroradiology",
issn = "0195-6108",
publisher = "American Society of Neuroradiology",
number = "7",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Atypical presentations of intracranial hypotension

T2 - Comparison with classic spontaneous intracranial hypotension

AU - Capizzano, A. A.

AU - Lai, L.

AU - Kim, J.

AU - Rizzo, Matthew

AU - Gray, L.

AU - Smoot, M. K.

AU - Moritani, T.

PY - 2016/7/1

Y1 - 2016/7/1

N2 - BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Atypical clinical presentations of spontaneous intracranial hypotension include obtundation, memory deficits, dementia with frontotemporal features, parkinsonism, and ataxia. The purpose of this study was to compare clinical and imaging features of spontaneous intracranial hypotension with typical-versus-atypical presentations. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Clinical records and neuroimaging of patients with spontaneous intracranial hypotension from September 2005 to August 2014 were retrospectively evaluated. Patients with classic spontaneous intracranial hypotension (n=33; mean age, 41.7=14.3 years) were compared with those with intracranial hypotension with atypical clinical presentation (n=8; mean age, 55.9=14.1 years) and 36 controls (mean age, 41.4=11.2 years). RESULTS: Patients with atypical spontaneous intracranial hypotension were older than those with classic spontaneous intracranial hypotension (55.9=14.1 years versus 41.7=14.3 years; P<.018). Symptom duration was shorter in classic compared with atypical spontaneous intracranial hypotension (3.78=7.18 months versus 21.93=18.43 months; P<.015). There was no significant difference in dural enhancement, subdural hematomas, or cerebellar tonsil herniation. Patients with atypical spontaneous intracranial hypotension had significantly more elongated anteroposterior midbrain diameter compared with those with classic spontaneous intracranial hypotension (33.6=2.9 mm versus 27.3=2.9 mm; P<.001) and shortened pontomammillary distance (2.8=1 mm versus 5.15=1.5 mm; P<.001). Patients with atypical spontaneous intracranial hypotension were less likely to become symptom-free, regardless of treatment, compared with those with classic spontaneous intracranial hypotension (2 13.99, P<.001). CONCLUSIONS: In this sample of 8 patients, atypical spontaneous intracranial hypotension was a more chronic syndrome compared with classic spontaneous intracranial hypotension, with more severe brain sagging, lower rates of clinical response, and frequent relapses. Awareness of atypical presentations of spontaneous intracranial hypotension is paramount.

AB - BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Atypical clinical presentations of spontaneous intracranial hypotension include obtundation, memory deficits, dementia with frontotemporal features, parkinsonism, and ataxia. The purpose of this study was to compare clinical and imaging features of spontaneous intracranial hypotension with typical-versus-atypical presentations. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Clinical records and neuroimaging of patients with spontaneous intracranial hypotension from September 2005 to August 2014 were retrospectively evaluated. Patients with classic spontaneous intracranial hypotension (n=33; mean age, 41.7=14.3 years) were compared with those with intracranial hypotension with atypical clinical presentation (n=8; mean age, 55.9=14.1 years) and 36 controls (mean age, 41.4=11.2 years). RESULTS: Patients with atypical spontaneous intracranial hypotension were older than those with classic spontaneous intracranial hypotension (55.9=14.1 years versus 41.7=14.3 years; P<.018). Symptom duration was shorter in classic compared with atypical spontaneous intracranial hypotension (3.78=7.18 months versus 21.93=18.43 months; P<.015). There was no significant difference in dural enhancement, subdural hematomas, or cerebellar tonsil herniation. Patients with atypical spontaneous intracranial hypotension had significantly more elongated anteroposterior midbrain diameter compared with those with classic spontaneous intracranial hypotension (33.6=2.9 mm versus 27.3=2.9 mm; P<.001) and shortened pontomammillary distance (2.8=1 mm versus 5.15=1.5 mm; P<.001). Patients with atypical spontaneous intracranial hypotension were less likely to become symptom-free, regardless of treatment, compared with those with classic spontaneous intracranial hypotension (2 13.99, P<.001). CONCLUSIONS: In this sample of 8 patients, atypical spontaneous intracranial hypotension was a more chronic syndrome compared with classic spontaneous intracranial hypotension, with more severe brain sagging, lower rates of clinical response, and frequent relapses. Awareness of atypical presentations of spontaneous intracranial hypotension is paramount.

KW - AP=average anteroposterior midbrain diameter

KW - FBSS=frontotemporal brain sagging syndrome

KW - PM=pontomammillary distance

KW - SIH=spontaneous intracranial hypotension

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84978484066&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84978484066&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.3174/ajnr.A4706

DO - 10.3174/ajnr.A4706

M3 - Article

VL - 37

SP - 1256

EP - 1261

JO - American Journal of Neuroradiology

JF - American Journal of Neuroradiology

SN - 0195-6108

IS - 7

ER -