Attitudes and expectations of 1995 gastroenterology graduates about gastroenterology

Timothy M McCashland, Rowen K Zetterman, Elizabeth I. Ruby, Courtney R. McCashland, Robert Swift Wigton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To learn more about current attitudes and expectations of recent (June 1995) graduates of gastroenterology fellowship programs, why they chose either a private practice or academic career, and what impact managed care or health care reform had in their decision. Methods: Between April and June 1995, an 8-page, 35-question survey questionnaire was mailed to graduating fellows and returned for evaluation. Results: Graduates believed managed care had an impact on job availability, but it was not a factor in their job choice. Forty percent of the respondents reported that finding a job was either difficult or very difficult. The majority of respondents (67%) are pursuing a career in private practice. Most private practice physicians (PP) trained in 2-yr programs whereas academic physicians (AC) trained for the most part in 3-yr programs. The principal criteria on which decisions regarding job selection were based were similar between the two groups: coworkers, geographic location, access to patient care, and ability to perform endoscopy. Respondents in PP and AC expected to work 50- 70 h/wk, care for patients with similar diseases, and have ample time for family. They would choose GI again as a career and believed that there is a future in GI. Salary expectations varied markedly between the two groups, and AC physicians were more concerned about their future financial needs. Twenty percent of PP physicians and 71% of AC physicians plan to participate in clinical research. Conclusions: Recent graduates of gastroenterology fellowship programs continue to have high expectations of their future careers. Although some had difficulty finding a job and stated that, although managed care had an impact on the job market, it had not yet become a major factor in their job selection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2091-2095
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Gastroenterology
Volume91
Issue number10
StatePublished - Oct 1 1996

Fingerprint

Gastroenterology
Physicians
Private Practice
Managed Care Programs
Patient Care
Geographic Locations
Aptitude
Health Care Reform
Salaries and Fringe Benefits
Endoscopy
Surveys and Questionnaires

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hepatology
  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Attitudes and expectations of 1995 gastroenterology graduates about gastroenterology. / McCashland, Timothy M; Zetterman, Rowen K; Ruby, Elizabeth I.; McCashland, Courtney R.; Wigton, Robert Swift.

In: American Journal of Gastroenterology, Vol. 91, No. 10, 01.10.1996, p. 2091-2095.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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