Attachment and depression differentially influence nicotine dependence among male and female undergraduates: A preliminary study

Dennis E. McChargue, Lee M. Cohen, Jessica W. Cook

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The authors surveyed a convenience sample of 208 undergraduate students who reported that they smoked cigarettes. The primary hypothesis they tested was whether gender predicted nicotine dependence. They further tested whether depression and attachment would mediate or moderate this relationship. Hierarchical regression analyses with social desirability and smoking stage of change entered as covariates indicated that women exhibited greater nicotine dependence than men did (p < .01). Lower attachment scores fully mediated this relationship, whereas elevated depression scores moderated the relationship. These findings suggest that depression and the inability to bond with peers may promote nicotine dependence among young female students.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)5-10
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of American College Health
Volume53
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2004

Fingerprint

Tobacco Use Disorder
nicotine
Depression
Students
Social Desirability
social desirability
female student
Tobacco Products
smoking
Smoking
Regression Analysis
regression
gender
student

Keywords

  • Attachment
  • Cigarette smoking
  • Depression
  • Mood regulation
  • Nicotine dependence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Attachment and depression differentially influence nicotine dependence among male and female undergraduates : A preliminary study. / McChargue, Dennis E.; Cohen, Lee M.; Cook, Jessica W.

In: Journal of American College Health, Vol. 53, No. 1, 01.01.2004, p. 5-10.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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