Associations between teacher emotional support and depressive symptoms in australian adolescents

A 5-year longitudinal study

Patrick Pössel, Kathleen M Rudasill, Michael G. Sawyer, Susan H. Spence, Annie C. Bjerg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Approximately 1/5 of adolescents develop depressive symptoms. Given that youths spend a good deal of their lives at school, it seems plausible that supportive relationships with teachers could benefit their emotional well-being. Thus, the purpose of this study is to examine the association between emotionally supportive teacher relationships and depression in adolescence. The so-called principle-effect and stress-buffer models could explain relationships between teacher emotional support and depressive symptoms, yet no study has used both models to test bidirectional relationships between teacher support and depressive symptoms in students separately by sex. Four-thousand three-hundred forty-one students (boys: n = 2,063; girls: n = 2,278) from Grades 8 to 12 completed the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), List of Threatening Experiences Questionnaire (LTEQ), and an instrument developed for the study to measure teacher support annually for 5 years. Results support neither of the 2 proposed models. Instead, they indicate that in the 1st years of high school, students of both sexes with average and high numbers of stressful events benefit from teacher support, while teacher support might have iatrogenic effects on students experiencing low numbers of stressful events. Possible explanations for the findings and future research are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2135-2146
Number of pages12
JournalDevelopmental psychology
Volume49
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2013

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teachers' association
Longitudinal Studies
longitudinal study
Depression
adolescent
Students
teacher
student
Epidemiologic Studies
event
Buffers
school
adolescence
school grade
well-being
questionnaire

Keywords

  • Depression
  • High school students
  • Supportive relationships
  • Teacher support

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Demography
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

Cite this

Associations between teacher emotional support and depressive symptoms in australian adolescents : A 5-year longitudinal study. / Pössel, Patrick; Rudasill, Kathleen M; Sawyer, Michael G.; Spence, Susan H.; Bjerg, Annie C.

In: Developmental psychology, Vol. 49, No. 11, 01.11.2013, p. 2135-2146.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pössel, Patrick ; Rudasill, Kathleen M ; Sawyer, Michael G. ; Spence, Susan H. ; Bjerg, Annie C. / Associations between teacher emotional support and depressive symptoms in australian adolescents : A 5-year longitudinal study. In: Developmental psychology. 2013 ; Vol. 49, No. 11. pp. 2135-2146.
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