Association of number of follow-up providers with outcomes in survivors of hematologic malignancies

Anthony J. Cannon, Deborah L. Darrington, Helen E. McIlvain, Linda K. Bauer, Julie Marie Vose, James Olen Armitage, Fausto R. Loberiza

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Studies examining follow-up care among cancer survivors have increased in number, and are mostly focused on who best provides care. It is not known whether having single or multiple physicians as follow-up providers has outcome implications. We prospectively studied the association between number of follow-up providers among survivors of hematologic malignancies and serious medical utilization (defined as emergency room visits or hospitalizations) within a 6-month period. Patients completing treatment (n314) were included. Patients seeing multiple follow-up providers were more likely to be younger, to reside farther away from the university hospital, to have prescription drug insurance, to have received prior cancer treatment, to have multiple myeloma, and to have undergone hematopoietic cell transplant as a part of cancer treatment. Multivariate analysis showed that the number of follow-up providers was not associated with serious medical utilization (odds ratio 1.29, 95 confidence interval 0.682.48, p0.44) after adjusting for patient factors. Our study showed that among survivors of hematologic malignancies, outcomes were not different for survivors who were seen by single or multiple follow-up providers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1862-1869
Number of pages8
JournalLeukemia and Lymphoma
Volume51
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2010

Fingerprint

Hematologic Neoplasms
Survivors
Pharmaceutical Services Insurance
Neoplasms
Aftercare
Prescription Drugs
Multiple Myeloma
Hospital Emergency Service
Hospitalization
Therapeutics
Multivariate Analysis
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Physicians
Transplants

Keywords

  • Follow-up care
  • hematologic malignancies
  • survivors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology
  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Association of number of follow-up providers with outcomes in survivors of hematologic malignancies. / Cannon, Anthony J.; Darrington, Deborah L.; McIlvain, Helen E.; Bauer, Linda K.; Vose, Julie Marie; Armitage, James Olen; Loberiza, Fausto R.

In: Leukemia and Lymphoma, Vol. 51, No. 10, 01.10.2010, p. 1862-1869.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cannon, Anthony J. ; Darrington, Deborah L. ; McIlvain, Helen E. ; Bauer, Linda K. ; Vose, Julie Marie ; Armitage, James Olen ; Loberiza, Fausto R. / Association of number of follow-up providers with outcomes in survivors of hematologic malignancies. In: Leukemia and Lymphoma. 2010 ; Vol. 51, No. 10. pp. 1862-1869.
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