Association between vitamin D status and physical performance: The inCHIANTI study

Denise K. Houston, Matteo Cesari, Luigi Ferrucci, Antonio Cherubini, Dario Maggio, Benedetta Bartali, Mary Ann Johnson, Gary G. Schwartz, Stephen B. Kritchevsky

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

225 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. Vitamin D status has been hypothesized to play a role in musculoskeletal function. Using data from the InCHIANTI study, we examined the association between vitamin D status and physical performance. Methods. A representative sample of 976 persons aged 65 years or older at study baseline were included. Physical performance was assessed using a short physical performance battery (SPPB) and handgrip strength. Multiple linear regression was used to examine the association between vitamin D (serum 25OHD), parathyroid hormone (PTH), and physical performance adjusting for sociodemographic variables, behavioral characteristics, body mass index, season, cognition, health conditions, creatinine, hemoglobin, and albumin. Results. Approximately 28.8% of women and 13.6% of men had vitamin D levels indicative of deficiency (serum 25OHD < 25.0 nmol/L) and 74.9% of women and 51.0% of men had vitamin D levels indicative of vitamin D insufficiency (serum 25OHD < 50.0 nmol/L). Vitamin D levels were significantly associated with SPPB score in men (β coefficient [standard error (SE)]: 0.38 [0.18], p = .04) and handgrip strength in men (2.44 [0.84], p = .004) and women (1.33 [0.53], p = .01). Men and women with serum 25OHD < 25.0 nmol/L had significantly lower SPPB scores whereas those with serum 25OHD < 50 nmol/L had significantly lower handgrip strength than those with serum 25OHD ≥25 and ≥50 nmol/L, respectively (p < .05). PTH was significantly associated with handgrip strength only (p = .01). Conclusions. Vitamin D status was inversely associated with poor physical performance. Given the high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in older populations, additional studies examining the association between vitamin D status and physical function are needed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)440-446
Number of pages7
JournalJournals of Gerontology - Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences
Volume62
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2007
Externally publishedYes

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Vitamin D
Serum
Parathyroid Hormone
Vitamin D Deficiency
Cognition
Albumins
Linear Models
Creatinine
Hemoglobins
Body Mass Index
Health
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aging
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

Houston, D. K., Cesari, M., Ferrucci, L., Cherubini, A., Maggio, D., Bartali, B., ... Kritchevsky, S. B. (2007). Association between vitamin D status and physical performance: The inCHIANTI study. Journals of Gerontology - Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences, 62(4), 440-446. https://doi.org/10.1093/gerona/62.4.440

Association between vitamin D status and physical performance : The inCHIANTI study. / Houston, Denise K.; Cesari, Matteo; Ferrucci, Luigi; Cherubini, Antonio; Maggio, Dario; Bartali, Benedetta; Johnson, Mary Ann; Schwartz, Gary G.; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.

In: Journals of Gerontology - Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences, Vol. 62, No. 4, 04.2007, p. 440-446.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Houston, DK, Cesari, M, Ferrucci, L, Cherubini, A, Maggio, D, Bartali, B, Johnson, MA, Schwartz, GG & Kritchevsky, SB 2007, 'Association between vitamin D status and physical performance: The inCHIANTI study', Journals of Gerontology - Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences, vol. 62, no. 4, pp. 440-446. https://doi.org/10.1093/gerona/62.4.440
Houston, Denise K. ; Cesari, Matteo ; Ferrucci, Luigi ; Cherubini, Antonio ; Maggio, Dario ; Bartali, Benedetta ; Johnson, Mary Ann ; Schwartz, Gary G. ; Kritchevsky, Stephen B. / Association between vitamin D status and physical performance : The inCHIANTI study. In: Journals of Gerontology - Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences. 2007 ; Vol. 62, No. 4. pp. 440-446.
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