Association between self-reported household practices and body mass index of US children and adolescents, 2005

Louise C. Mâsse, Heidi M. Blanck, Maria Valente, Audie A. Atienza, Tanya A. Agurs-Collins, Deanne Weber, Amy L Yaroch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: Parents can set household practices that influence children's behaviors. The objective of this study was to determine whether children (children and adolescents aged 9-18 y) who live in a household that has healthful practices related to behaviors associated with obesity have a lower body mass index (BMI). Methods: We analyzed data from the 2005 Styles mail panel survey (N = 1,685 parents and children). We used multiple logistic regression to assess associations between 4 household practices and 3 children's behaviors: watching television, participating in vigorous physical activity, and purchasing sodas and snacks at school. Results: Children watched more television if they had a television in their bedrooms, were less active as a family, and had no junk food restrictions at home. Children in less active families participated in about half as much VPA as children in more active families. Children purchased more sodas and snacks at school if they had a television in their bedrooms and their family consumed more meals at fast-food restaurants. Children whose families were less active were more likely to have a self-reported BMI at or above the 85th percentile. In addition, children who watched more television were more likely to have a self-reported BMI at or above the 85th percentile. Conclusion: Household practices were associated with children's behaviors and self-reported BMI. A household profile that includes being active as a family may counteract the increase in childhood obesity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number110149
JournalPreventing Chronic Disease
Volume9
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2012

Fingerprint

Body Mass Index
Television
Child Behavior
Snacks
Parents
Fast Foods
Restaurants
Pediatric Obesity
Postal Service
Meals
Obesity
Logistic Models
Exercise
Food

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Mâsse, L. C., Blanck, H. M., Valente, M., Atienza, A. A., Agurs-Collins, T. A., Weber, D., & Yaroch, A. L. (2012). Association between self-reported household practices and body mass index of US children and adolescents, 2005. Preventing Chronic Disease, 9(12), [110149]. https://doi.org/10.5888/pcd9.110149

Association between self-reported household practices and body mass index of US children and adolescents, 2005. / Mâsse, Louise C.; Blanck, Heidi M.; Valente, Maria; Atienza, Audie A.; Agurs-Collins, Tanya A.; Weber, Deanne; Yaroch, Amy L.

In: Preventing Chronic Disease, Vol. 9, No. 12, 110149, 01.12.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mâsse, LC, Blanck, HM, Valente, M, Atienza, AA, Agurs-Collins, TA, Weber, D & Yaroch, AL 2012, 'Association between self-reported household practices and body mass index of US children and adolescents, 2005', Preventing Chronic Disease, vol. 9, no. 12, 110149. https://doi.org/10.5888/pcd9.110149
Mâsse, Louise C. ; Blanck, Heidi M. ; Valente, Maria ; Atienza, Audie A. ; Agurs-Collins, Tanya A. ; Weber, Deanne ; Yaroch, Amy L. / Association between self-reported household practices and body mass index of US children and adolescents, 2005. In: Preventing Chronic Disease. 2012 ; Vol. 9, No. 12.
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