Assessing the efficacy of video versus direct laryngoscopy through retrospective comparison of 436 emergency intubation cases

Benjamen M. Jones, Ankit Agrawal, Thomas E Schulte

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Video laryngoscopy has become a common practice for tracheal intubations. However, information on its efficacy in emergency intubations is minimal. The external video monitor may act as a means for assistance by present staff, heighten teaching ability, and improve intubation outcomes. We conducted a retrospective review consisting of 436 patients requiring emergency intubation outside the operating room to evaluate the application of a C-MAC video laryngoscope for emergency intubation(s). Nine cases were removed, 315 underwent direct laryngoscopy, 73 underwent video laryngoscopy, and 39 underwent both methods. The C-MAC laryngoscope provided a significantly better visualization of the glottis (p = 0.02). The C-MAC also provided successful intubation on the first attempt in 82 % of the 39 direct laryngoscopy cases subsequently intubated with the C-MAC. The presence of the attending anesthesiologist (while the resident intubates) had no effect on complication rates; the number of attempts required and the grade view obtained were nonsignificant (p = 0.91 and p = 0.34, respectively). Overall, use of the C-MAC video laryngoscope provided a better view of the airway structures during an emergency intubation. The success of the C-MAC laryngoscope in intubation after failed direct laryngoscopy suggests the importance of the video laryngoscope as the primary intubation approach during an emergency intubation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)927-930
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Anesthesia
Volume27
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2013

Fingerprint

Laryngoscopy
Intubation
Emergencies
Laryngoscopes
Glottis
Operating Rooms
Teaching

Keywords

  • Airway
  • C-Mac
  • Direct laryngoscopy
  • Emergency intubation
  • Video laryngoscopy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

Cite this

Assessing the efficacy of video versus direct laryngoscopy through retrospective comparison of 436 emergency intubation cases. / Jones, Benjamen M.; Agrawal, Ankit; Schulte, Thomas E.

In: Journal of Anesthesia, Vol. 27, No. 6, 01.12.2013, p. 927-930.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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