Aspidodera kinsellai n. Sp. (nematoda: Heterakoidea) from nine-banded armadillos in middle america with notes on phylogeny and host-parasite biogeography

F. Agustín Jiménez, Ramón A. Carreno, Scott L. Gardner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aspidodera kinsellai n. Sp. (Heterakoidea: Aspidoderidae) from the 9-banded armadillo, Dasypus novemcinctus, is herein described. This nematode occurs from Costa Rica north through central Mexico where it can be found causing co-infections with Aspidodera sogandaresi. Aspidodera kinsellai n. Sp. can be discriminated from this and all other species in the family based on 3 key features, including (1) conspicuous lateral grooves with no lateral alae starting immediately after the hood and terminating at the cloacal/anal region; (2) long hoods in both male (360 μm) and female (401 μm), and (3) a relatively long (152 μm) terminal spine or terminus that gradually tapers to a point from the last pair of papillae. This is the 18th recognized species of the family and the 3rd in the genus present outside of South America. A phylogenetic analysis of the species in the genus with the use of the mitochondrial partial genes cytochrome C oxidase subunit 1 (cox1), the ribosomal large subunit (rrnL), and the internal transcriber spacer (ITS) shows that 2 species of Aspidodera may have entered into North America from the south via 2 independent events.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1056-1061
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Parasitology
Volume99
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2013

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Large Ribosome Subunits
Armadillos
Dasypus
Costa Rica
Dasypodidae
Nematoda
Mitochondrial Genes
South America
Electron Transport Complex IV
Phylogeny
cytochromes
North America
Mexico
Coinfection
mixed infection
biogeography
parasite
Parasites
phylogeny
Spine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Parasitology
  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics

Cite this

Aspidodera kinsellai n. Sp. (nematoda : Heterakoidea) from nine-banded armadillos in middle america with notes on phylogeny and host-parasite biogeography. / Jiménez, F. Agustín; Carreno, Ramón A.; Gardner, Scott L.

In: Journal of Parasitology, Vol. 99, No. 6, 01.12.2013, p. 1056-1061.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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