Ascorbic acid status as affected by dietary treatment in the Siberian sturgeon (Acipenser baeri Brandt)

Tissue concentration, mobilisation and L-gulonolactone oxidase activity

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22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A study was conducted to evaluate tissue storage and mobilisation of L-ascorbic acid (AA) in the Siberian sturgeon (Acipenser baeri) fed three different experimental diets. The three treatments consisted of a diet devoid of vitamin C (diet A0) and two diets supplemented with equivalent of 300 mg AA kg-1 in the form of either silicone-coated ascorbic acid (diet SC) or of ascorbyl-2-polyphosphate (diet AP). During the first phase (4 months) of the trial, six batches of 130 Siberian sturgeon (initial body weight: 25.5 ± 0.5 g) each were fed one of the three diets in duplicate. During the second phase (3 months), fish from groups SC and AP were switched to diet A0 and those fed diet A0 during the first phase were switched to diet SC. Irrespective of the dietary treatment, growth rates were not significantly different from each other. At the end of phase I, in all tissues studied, total ascorbic acid (TAA) concentrations were higher in Siberian sturgeon fed diet AP than in the other two groups. During phase II, tissue ascorbate depletion was also higher in the AP group than in the other two groups. Transfer of the AA-free diet fed group onto a diet supplemented with 300 mg AA kg-1 (diet SC) led to a slight increase in the TAA concentrations in all tissues. Blood plasma tyrosine concentrations were not significantly different between the three groups. Whole-body collagen levels were affected by dietary AA levels or forms at the end of phase I; the differences were not significant at the end of phase II. Muscle collagen levels were slightly affected. L-Gulonolactone oxidase activity was found in the kidney of Siberian sturgeon, but not in the liver. The ascorbyl-2-polyphosphate appears to be either better utilised by Siberian sturgeon, like in many other teleosts, or more stable than the silicone-coated AA during food processing and storage. Presence of L-gulonolactone oxidase activity in Siberian sturgeon kidney combined with the absence of gross scorbutic signs in AA-free diet fed groups expressing very good growth rates suggested no need of dietary A A by A. baeri.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)431-438
Number of pages8
JournalFish Physiology and Biochemistry
Volume15
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1996

Fingerprint

L-Gulonolactone Oxidase
ascorbic acid
Nutrition
Ascorbic Acid
mobilization
Tissue
diet
Diet
polyphosphates
Polyphosphates
silicone
collagen
tissue
tissues
L-gulonolactone oxidase
Acipenser baerii
Silicones
Food storage
Collagen
kidneys

Keywords

  • Collagen
  • Depletion
  • Diet
  • L-gulonolactone oxidase
  • Sturgeon
  • Tissue storage
  • Tyrosine
  • Vitamin C

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Physiology
  • Aquatic Science

Cite this

@article{0cd55939dd6f478da0cb42093a16af13,
title = "Ascorbic acid status as affected by dietary treatment in the Siberian sturgeon (Acipenser baeri Brandt): Tissue concentration, mobilisation and L-gulonolactone oxidase activity",
abstract = "A study was conducted to evaluate tissue storage and mobilisation of L-ascorbic acid (AA) in the Siberian sturgeon (Acipenser baeri) fed three different experimental diets. The three treatments consisted of a diet devoid of vitamin C (diet A0) and two diets supplemented with equivalent of 300 mg AA kg-1 in the form of either silicone-coated ascorbic acid (diet SC) or of ascorbyl-2-polyphosphate (diet AP). During the first phase (4 months) of the trial, six batches of 130 Siberian sturgeon (initial body weight: 25.5 ± 0.5 g) each were fed one of the three diets in duplicate. During the second phase (3 months), fish from groups SC and AP were switched to diet A0 and those fed diet A0 during the first phase were switched to diet SC. Irrespective of the dietary treatment, growth rates were not significantly different from each other. At the end of phase I, in all tissues studied, total ascorbic acid (TAA) concentrations were higher in Siberian sturgeon fed diet AP than in the other two groups. During phase II, tissue ascorbate depletion was also higher in the AP group than in the other two groups. Transfer of the AA-free diet fed group onto a diet supplemented with 300 mg AA kg-1 (diet SC) led to a slight increase in the TAA concentrations in all tissues. Blood plasma tyrosine concentrations were not significantly different between the three groups. Whole-body collagen levels were affected by dietary AA levels or forms at the end of phase I; the differences were not significant at the end of phase II. Muscle collagen levels were slightly affected. L-Gulonolactone oxidase activity was found in the kidney of Siberian sturgeon, but not in the liver. The ascorbyl-2-polyphosphate appears to be either better utilised by Siberian sturgeon, like in many other teleosts, or more stable than the silicone-coated AA during food processing and storage. Presence of L-gulonolactone oxidase activity in Siberian sturgeon kidney combined with the absence of gross scorbutic signs in AA-free diet fed groups expressing very good growth rates suggested no need of dietary A A by A. baeri.",
keywords = "Collagen, Depletion, Diet, L-gulonolactone oxidase, Sturgeon, Tissue storage, Tyrosine, Vitamin C",
author = "Moreau, {Regis F}",
year = "1996",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/BF01875586",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Ascorbic acid status as affected by dietary treatment in the Siberian sturgeon (Acipenser baeri Brandt)

T2 - Tissue concentration, mobilisation and L-gulonolactone oxidase activity

AU - Moreau, Regis F

PY - 1996/1/1

Y1 - 1996/1/1

N2 - A study was conducted to evaluate tissue storage and mobilisation of L-ascorbic acid (AA) in the Siberian sturgeon (Acipenser baeri) fed three different experimental diets. The three treatments consisted of a diet devoid of vitamin C (diet A0) and two diets supplemented with equivalent of 300 mg AA kg-1 in the form of either silicone-coated ascorbic acid (diet SC) or of ascorbyl-2-polyphosphate (diet AP). During the first phase (4 months) of the trial, six batches of 130 Siberian sturgeon (initial body weight: 25.5 ± 0.5 g) each were fed one of the three diets in duplicate. During the second phase (3 months), fish from groups SC and AP were switched to diet A0 and those fed diet A0 during the first phase were switched to diet SC. Irrespective of the dietary treatment, growth rates were not significantly different from each other. At the end of phase I, in all tissues studied, total ascorbic acid (TAA) concentrations were higher in Siberian sturgeon fed diet AP than in the other two groups. During phase II, tissue ascorbate depletion was also higher in the AP group than in the other two groups. Transfer of the AA-free diet fed group onto a diet supplemented with 300 mg AA kg-1 (diet SC) led to a slight increase in the TAA concentrations in all tissues. Blood plasma tyrosine concentrations were not significantly different between the three groups. Whole-body collagen levels were affected by dietary AA levels or forms at the end of phase I; the differences were not significant at the end of phase II. Muscle collagen levels were slightly affected. L-Gulonolactone oxidase activity was found in the kidney of Siberian sturgeon, but not in the liver. The ascorbyl-2-polyphosphate appears to be either better utilised by Siberian sturgeon, like in many other teleosts, or more stable than the silicone-coated AA during food processing and storage. Presence of L-gulonolactone oxidase activity in Siberian sturgeon kidney combined with the absence of gross scorbutic signs in AA-free diet fed groups expressing very good growth rates suggested no need of dietary A A by A. baeri.

AB - A study was conducted to evaluate tissue storage and mobilisation of L-ascorbic acid (AA) in the Siberian sturgeon (Acipenser baeri) fed three different experimental diets. The three treatments consisted of a diet devoid of vitamin C (diet A0) and two diets supplemented with equivalent of 300 mg AA kg-1 in the form of either silicone-coated ascorbic acid (diet SC) or of ascorbyl-2-polyphosphate (diet AP). During the first phase (4 months) of the trial, six batches of 130 Siberian sturgeon (initial body weight: 25.5 ± 0.5 g) each were fed one of the three diets in duplicate. During the second phase (3 months), fish from groups SC and AP were switched to diet A0 and those fed diet A0 during the first phase were switched to diet SC. Irrespective of the dietary treatment, growth rates were not significantly different from each other. At the end of phase I, in all tissues studied, total ascorbic acid (TAA) concentrations were higher in Siberian sturgeon fed diet AP than in the other two groups. During phase II, tissue ascorbate depletion was also higher in the AP group than in the other two groups. Transfer of the AA-free diet fed group onto a diet supplemented with 300 mg AA kg-1 (diet SC) led to a slight increase in the TAA concentrations in all tissues. Blood plasma tyrosine concentrations were not significantly different between the three groups. Whole-body collagen levels were affected by dietary AA levels or forms at the end of phase I; the differences were not significant at the end of phase II. Muscle collagen levels were slightly affected. L-Gulonolactone oxidase activity was found in the kidney of Siberian sturgeon, but not in the liver. The ascorbyl-2-polyphosphate appears to be either better utilised by Siberian sturgeon, like in many other teleosts, or more stable than the silicone-coated AA during food processing and storage. Presence of L-gulonolactone oxidase activity in Siberian sturgeon kidney combined with the absence of gross scorbutic signs in AA-free diet fed groups expressing very good growth rates suggested no need of dietary A A by A. baeri.

KW - Collagen

KW - Depletion

KW - Diet

KW - L-gulonolactone oxidase

KW - Sturgeon

KW - Tissue storage

KW - Tyrosine

KW - Vitamin C

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U2 - 10.1007/BF01875586

DO - 10.1007/BF01875586

M3 - Article

VL - 15

SP - 431

EP - 438

JO - Fish Physiology and Biochemistry

JF - Fish Physiology and Biochemistry

SN - 0920-1742

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