Are male and female avatars perceived equally in 3-D virtual worlds?

David DeWester, Fiona Fui Hoon Nah, Sarah J. Gervais, Keng Siau

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Virtual worlds are three-dimensional, computer-generated worlds in which users take the form of avatars and use those avatars to interact with objects and other avatars in the virtual world. Virtual worlds are growing in importance in both educational institutions and businesses. Educational institutions have adopted virtual worlds as a medium for instructional delivery whereas businesses are using virtual worlds for recruitment, training, collaboration, and marketing. Given these emerging phenomena, a better understanding of behavioral and perceptual issues in virtual worlds is warranted. We propose a research model to study the interaction effects of gender stereotypicality of male and female avatars and gender typicality of tasks on trust perceptions. Gender stereotypes have been widely studied in the real world along with their effects on trust perceptions. An experiment is proposed to examine the effects of gender stereotypes on trust perceptions in virtual worlds. Implications and expected contributions are also discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication15th Americas Conference on Information Systems 2009, AMCIS 2009
Pages3088-3095
Number of pages8
StatePublished - Dec 1 2009
Event15th Americas Conference on Information Systems 2009, AMCIS 2009 - San Francisco, CA, United States
Duration: Aug 6 2009Aug 9 2009

Publication series

Name15th Americas Conference on Information Systems 2009, AMCIS 2009
Volume5

Conference

Conference15th Americas Conference on Information Systems 2009, AMCIS 2009
CountryUnited States
CitySan Francisco, CA
Period8/6/098/9/09

Fingerprint

gender
educational institution
stereotype
Marketing
Industry
marketing
Experiments
experiment
interaction

Keywords

  • Avatars
  • Perception of avatars
  • Stereotypicality
  • Virtual worlds

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Science Applications
  • Computer Networks and Communications
  • Information Systems
  • Library and Information Sciences

Cite this

DeWester, D., Nah, F. F. H., Gervais, S. J., & Siau, K. (2009). Are male and female avatars perceived equally in 3-D virtual worlds? In 15th Americas Conference on Information Systems 2009, AMCIS 2009 (pp. 3088-3095). (15th Americas Conference on Information Systems 2009, AMCIS 2009; Vol. 5).

Are male and female avatars perceived equally in 3-D virtual worlds? / DeWester, David; Nah, Fiona Fui Hoon; Gervais, Sarah J.; Siau, Keng.

15th Americas Conference on Information Systems 2009, AMCIS 2009. 2009. p. 3088-3095 (15th Americas Conference on Information Systems 2009, AMCIS 2009; Vol. 5).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

DeWester, D, Nah, FFH, Gervais, SJ & Siau, K 2009, Are male and female avatars perceived equally in 3-D virtual worlds? in 15th Americas Conference on Information Systems 2009, AMCIS 2009. 15th Americas Conference on Information Systems 2009, AMCIS 2009, vol. 5, pp. 3088-3095, 15th Americas Conference on Information Systems 2009, AMCIS 2009, San Francisco, CA, United States, 8/6/09.
DeWester D, Nah FFH, Gervais SJ, Siau K. Are male and female avatars perceived equally in 3-D virtual worlds? In 15th Americas Conference on Information Systems 2009, AMCIS 2009. 2009. p. 3088-3095. (15th Americas Conference on Information Systems 2009, AMCIS 2009).
DeWester, David ; Nah, Fiona Fui Hoon ; Gervais, Sarah J. ; Siau, Keng. / Are male and female avatars perceived equally in 3-D virtual worlds?. 15th Americas Conference on Information Systems 2009, AMCIS 2009. 2009. pp. 3088-3095 (15th Americas Conference on Information Systems 2009, AMCIS 2009).
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