Applying ecological systems theory to sexual revictimization of youth: A review with implications for research and practice

Samantha L. Pittenger, Terrence Z. Huit, David J Hansen

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article reviews the literature on sexual revictimization, integrating findings from studies with adult and youth samples and organizing research evidence within a social ecological framework. Multiple victimization experiences are common among children, adolescents, and adults with histories of child sexual abuse; they are associated with negative cumulative effects on the individual and, through these negative sequelae, perpetuate a cycle of victimization. While much of the research has focused on individual factors that promote revictimization, there is emerging evidence that external influences on the individual may influence risk for subsequent victimization. Specifically, family, perpetrators, and engagement with helping professionals may all mediate revictimization risk. Although limited evidence prevents conclusions regarding societal values, public policy, and law, these systems may also impact individual risk for experiencing multiple victimizations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)35-45
Number of pages11
JournalAggression and Violent Behavior
Volume26
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016

Fingerprint

Systems Theory
Crime Victims
Ecosystem
Research
Sexual Child Abuse
Public Policy

Keywords

  • Child sexual abuse
  • Revictimization
  • Social ecology
  • Youth

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Applying ecological systems theory to sexual revictimization of youth : A review with implications for research and practice. / Pittenger, Samantha L.; Huit, Terrence Z.; Hansen, David J.

In: Aggression and Violent Behavior, Vol. 26, 01.01.2016, p. 35-45.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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