Applying a Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective to Disruptive Behavior Disorders: Implications for Schools

Patrick M. Tyler, Stuart F White, Ronald W. Thompson, Robert James Blair

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

A cognitive neuroscience perspective seeks to understand behavior, in this case disruptive behavior disorders (DBD), in terms of dysfunction in cognitive processes underpinned by neural processes. While this type of approach has clear implications for clinical mental health practice, it also has implications for school-based assessment and intervention with children and adolescents who have disruptive behavior and aggression. This review articulates a cognitive neuroscience account of DBD by discussing the neurocognitive dysfunction related to emotional empathy, threat sensitivity, reinforcement-based decision-making, and response inhibition. The potential implications for current and future classroom-based assessments and interventions for students with these deficits are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)17-42
Number of pages26
JournalDevelopmental Neuropsychology
Volume44
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2 2019

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Attention Deficit and Disruptive Behavior Disorders
Aggression
Decision Making
Mental Health
Students
Cognitive Neuroscience
Reinforcement (Psychology)
Cognitive Dysfunction
Inhibition (Psychology)
Practice (Psychology)
Problem Behavior

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Applying a Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective to Disruptive Behavior Disorders : Implications for Schools. / Tyler, Patrick M.; White, Stuart F; Thompson, Ronald W.; Blair, Robert James.

In: Developmental Neuropsychology, Vol. 44, No. 1, 02.01.2019, p. 17-42.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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