Antibody to hepatitis B surface antigen in nonprimate animal species

Jay H. Hoofnagle, Daniel Francis Schafer, Peter Ferenci, Jeanne G. Waggoner, John Vergalla, Milton April, Lyndsay Phillips

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The hepatitis B virus infects only humans and higher apes. Viruses similar to the human hepatitis B virus (hepadna viruses) have been discovered in several nonprimate species including woodchucks, ground squirrels, and domesticated ducks. To search for other models of hepatitis B virus infection, we screened serum specimens from 64 exotic animals (24 species), 56 domesticated animals (6 species), and 52 laboratory animals (3 species). Samples were tested for deoxyribonucleic acid polymerase by enzymatic assay and for hepatitis B surface antigen and antibody and antibody to hepatitis B core antigen by radioimmunoassays. All sera were negative for deoxyribonucleic acid polymerase, hepatitis B surface antigen, and antibody to hepatis B core antigen suggesting that none of these animals harbored hepadna viruses in serum. However, 48% of the sera from 58% of the 33 species were reactive for antibody to hepatitis B surface antigen. This reactivity was blocked by human serum positive for hepatitis B surface antigen but not by control human serum. The antibody to hepatitis B surface antigen was generally present in low titer (95% were ≤ 1: 16) and was often directed against subdeterminants of hepatitis B surface antigen (anti-d, anti-y, or anti-w). Characterization of the antibody to hepatitis B surface antigen by gel chromatography, sucrose density ultracentrifugation, affinity chromatography, and chemical inactivation suggested that it was entirely or predominantly immunoglobulin M antibody. Thus, many animals species have naturally occurring immunoglobulin M antibody to hepatitis B surface antigen detectable by radioimmunoassay. This antibody could arise as a result of either the intermittent spontaneous maturation of clones of antibody to hepatitis B surface antigen forming lymphocytes or exposure to environmental antigens that share epitopes with hepatitis B surface antigen. Similar naturally occurring antibody to hepatitis B surface antigen may be present in some humans.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1478-1482
Number of pages5
JournalGastroenterology
Volume84
Issue number6
StatePublished - Jan 1 1983

Fingerprint

Hepatitis B Surface Antigens
Antibodies
Serum
Hepatitis B virus
Hepatitis B Antibodies
Viruses
Radioimmunoassay
Immunoglobulin M
Marmota
Hepatitis B Core Antigens
Antigens
Sciuridae
Ducks
Ultracentrifugation
DNA
Domestic Animals
Hominidae
Environmental Exposure
Laboratory Animals
Enzyme Assays

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hepatology
  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Hoofnagle, J. H., Schafer, D. F., Ferenci, P., Waggoner, J. G., Vergalla, J., April, M., & Phillips, L. (1983). Antibody to hepatitis B surface antigen in nonprimate animal species. Gastroenterology, 84(6), 1478-1482.

Antibody to hepatitis B surface antigen in nonprimate animal species. / Hoofnagle, Jay H.; Schafer, Daniel Francis; Ferenci, Peter; Waggoner, Jeanne G.; Vergalla, John; April, Milton; Phillips, Lyndsay.

In: Gastroenterology, Vol. 84, No. 6, 01.01.1983, p. 1478-1482.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hoofnagle, JH, Schafer, DF, Ferenci, P, Waggoner, JG, Vergalla, J, April, M & Phillips, L 1983, 'Antibody to hepatitis B surface antigen in nonprimate animal species', Gastroenterology, vol. 84, no. 6, pp. 1478-1482.
Hoofnagle JH, Schafer DF, Ferenci P, Waggoner JG, Vergalla J, April M et al. Antibody to hepatitis B surface antigen in nonprimate animal species. Gastroenterology. 1983 Jan 1;84(6):1478-1482.
Hoofnagle, Jay H. ; Schafer, Daniel Francis ; Ferenci, Peter ; Waggoner, Jeanne G. ; Vergalla, John ; April, Milton ; Phillips, Lyndsay. / Antibody to hepatitis B surface antigen in nonprimate animal species. In: Gastroenterology. 1983 ; Vol. 84, No. 6. pp. 1478-1482.
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