Anti-Staphylococcal Biofilm Effects of Human Cathelicidin Peptides

Biswajit Mishra, Radha M. Golla, Kyle Lau, Tamara Lushnikova, Guangshun Wang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Staphylococcus aureus can live together in the form of biofilms to avoid elimination by the host. Thus, a useful strategy to counteract bacterial biofilms is to re-engineer human antimicrobial peptide LL-37 so that it can be used as a remedy for preventing and removing biofilms. This study reports antibiofilm effects of four human cathelicidin LL-37 peptides against community-associated and hospital isolated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains. Although the intact molecule LL-37 inhibited biofilm formation at low concentrations, it did not inhibit bacterial attachment nor disrupt preformed biofilms. However, two 17-residue peptides, GF-17 and 17BIPHE2, inhibited bacterial attachment, biofilm growth, and disrupted established biofilms. An inactive peptide RI-10 was used as a negative control. Our results obtained using the S. aureus mutants in a static biofilm model are consistent with the literature obtained in a flow cell biofilm model. Because 17BIPHE2 is the most effective biofilm disruptor with desired stability to proteases, it is a promising lead for developing new anti-MRSA biofilm agents.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)117-121
Number of pages5
JournalACS Medicinal Chemistry Letters
Volume7
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 14 2016

Fingerprint

Biofilms
Peptides
Methicillin
Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus
Staphylococcus aureus
CAP18 lipopolysaccharide-binding protein
Community Hospital
Peptide Hydrolases
Engineers
Molecules

Keywords

  • 17BIPHE2
  • Biofilms
  • GF-17
  • LL-37
  • Staphylococcus aureus
  • attachment mutants

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Drug Discovery
  • Organic Chemistry

Cite this

Anti-Staphylococcal Biofilm Effects of Human Cathelicidin Peptides. / Mishra, Biswajit; Golla, Radha M.; Lau, Kyle; Lushnikova, Tamara; Wang, Guangshun.

In: ACS Medicinal Chemistry Letters, Vol. 7, No. 1, 14.01.2016, p. 117-121.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mishra, Biswajit ; Golla, Radha M. ; Lau, Kyle ; Lushnikova, Tamara ; Wang, Guangshun. / Anti-Staphylococcal Biofilm Effects of Human Cathelicidin Peptides. In: ACS Medicinal Chemistry Letters. 2016 ; Vol. 7, No. 1. pp. 117-121.
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