Analysis of human endothelial cells and cortical neurons for susceptibility to HIV-1 infection and co-receptor expression

G. D. Kanmogne, P. Grammas, R. C. Kennedy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Neuronal cell death is believed to be the underlying cause of neurological disease and AIDS dementia often seen in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected patients. The means by which HIV invades the brain is still unknown and the mechanism of neuronal cell death remains to be elucidated. The aim of this study was to determine if direct infection of human brain endothelial cells and neurons play a role in viral invasion of the brain and neuronal cell death, respectively. To this effect, we evaluated human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC) and human cortical neurons (HCN) for the expression of HIV co-receptors and their susceptibility to HIV-1 infection. While both HBMEC and HCN failed to express any CXCR4 and CCR5 on their cell surface, as assessed by flow cytometry, RT-PCR revealed the presence of CXCR4 and CCR5 mRNA in HBMEC but not in HCN. Two dual tropic HIV-1 primary isolates failed to infect both cell types as determined by p24 antigen capture ELISA, RT-PCR and DNA PCR. These data support the hypothesis that no productive infection of HBMEC and HCN occurs in vitro and suggest that other cell types are the primary focus of HIV-1 infection in the brain.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)519-528
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of neurovirology
Volume6
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2000

Fingerprint

Virus Diseases
HIV-1
Endothelial Cells
Neurons
Brain
Cell Death
HIV
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Virus Receptors
Infection
Dementia
Flow Cytometry
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Antigens
Messenger RNA
DNA

Keywords

  • Brain endothelial cells
  • HIV co-receptor
  • HIV infection
  • Neurons

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience
  • Virology

Cite this

Analysis of human endothelial cells and cortical neurons for susceptibility to HIV-1 infection and co-receptor expression. / Kanmogne, G. D.; Grammas, P.; Kennedy, R. C.

In: Journal of neurovirology, Vol. 6, No. 6, 01.01.2000, p. 519-528.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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