An open environment for reconstructing 2D images into 3D finite element models

James M. Hoppner, Robert D. Throne, Lorraine G. Olson, John Robert Windle

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Eventual clinical utilization of various proposed techniques for determining the epicardial potentials based on measurements on the body surface requires the rapid development of accurate human torso models. These models are generally constructed using data obtained via computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Automatic and/or manual segmentation of the anatomical items in the individual slices is typically done as a preprocessing step before surface reconstruction. We have developed a group of interactive, menudriven routines to assist in processing these CT or MRI slices for input into a commercial finite element package for subsequent finite element modeling of the torso.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationComputers in Cardiology
Pages429-432
Number of pages4
Volume0
Edition0
StatePublished - 1996

Fingerprint

Torso
Magnetic resonance
Tomography
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Imaging techniques
Surface reconstruction
Human Development
Processing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Software
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Hoppner, J. M., Throne, R. D., Olson, L. G., & Windle, J. R. (1996). An open environment for reconstructing 2D images into 3D finite element models. In Computers in Cardiology (0 ed., Vol. 0, pp. 429-432)

An open environment for reconstructing 2D images into 3D finite element models. / Hoppner, James M.; Throne, Robert D.; Olson, Lorraine G.; Windle, John Robert.

Computers in Cardiology. Vol. 0 0. ed. 1996. p. 429-432.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Hoppner, JM, Throne, RD, Olson, LG & Windle, JR 1996, An open environment for reconstructing 2D images into 3D finite element models. in Computers in Cardiology. 0 edn, vol. 0, pp. 429-432.
Hoppner JM, Throne RD, Olson LG, Windle JR. An open environment for reconstructing 2D images into 3D finite element models. In Computers in Cardiology. 0 ed. Vol. 0. 1996. p. 429-432
Hoppner, James M. ; Throne, Robert D. ; Olson, Lorraine G. ; Windle, John Robert. / An open environment for reconstructing 2D images into 3D finite element models. Computers in Cardiology. Vol. 0 0. ed. 1996. pp. 429-432
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