An interdisciplinary student-run diabetes clinic

Reflections on the collaborative training process

W. D. Robinson, R. E S Barnacle, R. Pretorius, Audrey Paulman

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Diabetes is a growing health concern in the United States. Because of the complexity of diabetes, researchers have found collaborative care for diabetic patients to be effective. The University of Nebraska Medical Center applied this approach in an interdisciplinary student-run clinic to provide treatment to low-income, noninsured, diabetic patients. Students who run this clinic are from a variety of disciplines, including medicine, nursing, pharmacy, dietetics, and medical technology. Medical family therapy was added to the team after a need for more holistic treatment arose. Benefits of this model include a biopsychosocial perspective from which to view treatment, a foundation for future collaboration, an opportunity for cross training, and immediacy of on-site consultation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)490-496
Number of pages7
JournalFamilies, Systems and Health
Volume22
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2004

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Family Therapy
Dietetics
Patient Care
Nursing
Therapeutics
Referral and Consultation
Research Personnel
Medicine
Technology
Health
Student Run Clinic

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

An interdisciplinary student-run diabetes clinic : Reflections on the collaborative training process. / Robinson, W. D.; Barnacle, R. E S; Pretorius, R.; Paulman, Audrey.

In: Families, Systems and Health, Vol. 22, No. 4, 01.12.2004, p. 490-496.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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