An examination of the impact of drug court clients’ perceptions of procedural justice on graduation rates and recidivism

Cassandra A. Atkin-Plunk, Gaylene Armstrong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Over the years, researchers have found drug courts reduce recidivism for participants. Scholars have hypothesized that drug courts are effective at producing positive outcomes for participants due in part to a case management approach that implements concepts of procedural justice. Using a convenience sample of participants involved in one drug court, this study adds to the limited body of research on procedural justice and drug courts by examining whether variation in drug court clients’ perceptions of procedural justice is related to their likelihood of graduation from drug court and recidivism. Results, policy implications, and recommendations for future research are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)525-547
Number of pages23
JournalJournal of Offender Rehabilitation
Volume55
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 16 2016

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Social Justice
justice
drug
examination
Pharmaceutical Preparations
case management
Case Management
Research Personnel
Research

Keywords

  • Drug courts
  • problem-solving courts
  • procedural justice
  • recidivism

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rehabilitation
  • Law

Cite this

An examination of the impact of drug court clients’ perceptions of procedural justice on graduation rates and recidivism. / Atkin-Plunk, Cassandra A.; Armstrong, Gaylene.

In: Journal of Offender Rehabilitation, Vol. 55, No. 8, 16.11.2016, p. 525-547.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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