An assessment of scales measuring constructs in tests of criminological theory based on national youth survey data

Todd A. Armstrong, Daniel R. Lee, Gaylene Armstrong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Researchers have utilized the National Youth Survey (NYS) data to test a variety of theoretical explanations of criminal behavior. Here, the authors offer an assessment of scales used in tests of criminological theory based on NYS data. The authors conducted this assessment to provide results informing future tests of theory. Their analyses focus on understanding the extent to which scales representative of different theories are actually based on the same item content. They test for two distinct processes that may explain this phenomenon. In the first process, scales measuring a given construct are attributed to different theories. In the second process, scales measuring different constructs are based on the same items. Results show that both of the processes described above contribute to the use of the same NYS items in scales that are attributed to different theories. To inform future tests of theory, the authors identify the sections of the NYS where each of these processes are most prevalent, in effect identifying the areas of the NYS that future tests of theory should treat with the greatest care. Based on the implications of each process identified above, the authors also offer some suggestions to strengthen future tests of theory using NYS data.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)73-105
Number of pages33
JournalJournal of Research in Crime and Delinquency
Volume46
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2009

Fingerprint

Surveys and Questionnaires
Research Personnel
Criminal Behavior

Keywords

  • Construct
  • Theory
  • Validity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology

Cite this

An assessment of scales measuring constructs in tests of criminological theory based on national youth survey data. / Armstrong, Todd A.; Lee, Daniel R.; Armstrong, Gaylene.

In: Journal of Research in Crime and Delinquency, Vol. 46, No. 1, 01.02.2009, p. 73-105.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{b1278416feb745b6babd0aa489b3ff24,
title = "An assessment of scales measuring constructs in tests of criminological theory based on national youth survey data",
abstract = "Researchers have utilized the National Youth Survey (NYS) data to test a variety of theoretical explanations of criminal behavior. Here, the authors offer an assessment of scales used in tests of criminological theory based on NYS data. The authors conducted this assessment to provide results informing future tests of theory. Their analyses focus on understanding the extent to which scales representative of different theories are actually based on the same item content. They test for two distinct processes that may explain this phenomenon. In the first process, scales measuring a given construct are attributed to different theories. In the second process, scales measuring different constructs are based on the same items. Results show that both of the processes described above contribute to the use of the same NYS items in scales that are attributed to different theories. To inform future tests of theory, the authors identify the sections of the NYS where each of these processes are most prevalent, in effect identifying the areas of the NYS that future tests of theory should treat with the greatest care. Based on the implications of each process identified above, the authors also offer some suggestions to strengthen future tests of theory using NYS data.",
keywords = "Construct, Theory, Validity",
author = "Armstrong, {Todd A.} and Lee, {Daniel R.} and Gaylene Armstrong",
year = "2009",
month = "2",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/0022427808326588",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "46",
pages = "73--105",
journal = "Journal of Research in Crime and Delinquency",
issn = "0022-4278",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Inc.",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - An assessment of scales measuring constructs in tests of criminological theory based on national youth survey data

AU - Armstrong, Todd A.

AU - Lee, Daniel R.

AU - Armstrong, Gaylene

PY - 2009/2/1

Y1 - 2009/2/1

N2 - Researchers have utilized the National Youth Survey (NYS) data to test a variety of theoretical explanations of criminal behavior. Here, the authors offer an assessment of scales used in tests of criminological theory based on NYS data. The authors conducted this assessment to provide results informing future tests of theory. Their analyses focus on understanding the extent to which scales representative of different theories are actually based on the same item content. They test for two distinct processes that may explain this phenomenon. In the first process, scales measuring a given construct are attributed to different theories. In the second process, scales measuring different constructs are based on the same items. Results show that both of the processes described above contribute to the use of the same NYS items in scales that are attributed to different theories. To inform future tests of theory, the authors identify the sections of the NYS where each of these processes are most prevalent, in effect identifying the areas of the NYS that future tests of theory should treat with the greatest care. Based on the implications of each process identified above, the authors also offer some suggestions to strengthen future tests of theory using NYS data.

AB - Researchers have utilized the National Youth Survey (NYS) data to test a variety of theoretical explanations of criminal behavior. Here, the authors offer an assessment of scales used in tests of criminological theory based on NYS data. The authors conducted this assessment to provide results informing future tests of theory. Their analyses focus on understanding the extent to which scales representative of different theories are actually based on the same item content. They test for two distinct processes that may explain this phenomenon. In the first process, scales measuring a given construct are attributed to different theories. In the second process, scales measuring different constructs are based on the same items. Results show that both of the processes described above contribute to the use of the same NYS items in scales that are attributed to different theories. To inform future tests of theory, the authors identify the sections of the NYS where each of these processes are most prevalent, in effect identifying the areas of the NYS that future tests of theory should treat with the greatest care. Based on the implications of each process identified above, the authors also offer some suggestions to strengthen future tests of theory using NYS data.

KW - Construct

KW - Theory

KW - Validity

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=58149154375&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=58149154375&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/0022427808326588

DO - 10.1177/0022427808326588

M3 - Article

VL - 46

SP - 73

EP - 105

JO - Journal of Research in Crime and Delinquency

JF - Journal of Research in Crime and Delinquency

SN - 0022-4278

IS - 1

ER -