An accelerated rural training program

James H. Stageman, Robert C. Bowman, Jeffrey Dale Harrison

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Several authors have pointed out the need for enhanced training for those residents contemplating rural practices. Most students and policy makers are reluctant to commit to primary care training beyond the required 3 years. Methods: The University of Nebraska Medical Center received approval for an accelerated family practice training program in 1993, and developed a 4-year program that requires a 1-year rural procedures fellowship and a commitment to practice in rural Nebraska. Results: The Nebraska accelerated rural training program has recruited 10 classes to this program and has placed more than 50% of the graduates in communities with a population of less than 8,000. Conclusion: The requirements of this program are unique. Special consideration must address the issues of recruitment of students, integration into the basic program, licensure issues, determination of fellowship training needs, and faculty recruitment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)124-130
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of the American Board of Family Practice
Volume16
Issue number2
StatePublished - Mar 1 2003

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Education
Students
Family Practice
Licensure
Administrative Personnel
Primary Health Care
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

An accelerated rural training program. / Stageman, James H.; Bowman, Robert C.; Harrison, Jeffrey Dale.

In: Journal of the American Board of Family Practice, Vol. 16, No. 2, 01.03.2003, p. 124-130.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Stageman, James H. ; Bowman, Robert C. ; Harrison, Jeffrey Dale. / An accelerated rural training program. In: Journal of the American Board of Family Practice. 2003 ; Vol. 16, No. 2. pp. 124-130.
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